Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a vital infinite for loop that allows a sensor to keep updating its values. However I would like to break that for loop when another sensor brings in new values. How can I switch from one infinite for loop to another?

Current code:

for(;;){

    SON_Start();
    // Wait 65ms for max range time
    delay10ms(7);
    // Read Range
    i = SON_Read(SON_ADDRESSES[sonarReading]);
    // pause
    delayMs(100);
        if(i<15)
        drive(200, RadCW);

    }

What I would like to add:

If Sensor2 returns a reading (e.g. Sensor2 > 20), then I want to break the loop and goto another infinite for loop to begin a new function.

share|improve this question
1  
Please don't close this question, folks. And, in future, if you have this kind of situation crop up again, flag for moderator attention. We prefer to try and salvage a situation rather than repost questions. –  Will Feb 13 '12 at 13:45
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

If you are looking for "switching between 2 infinite loops" it could be "wrapped" by third loop and this "switching" could be done by simple break.

But since you want your program to stop some day, this loop could be placed within the function and you could use return; for ending it:

void myMagicLoop()
{
    for(;;)
    {
        for(;;)
        {
            if ( I should stop )
                return;

            if ( I should switch to second loop )
                break;
        }
        for(;;)
        {
            if ( I should stop )
                return;

            if ( I should switch back to first loop)
                break;
        }
    }
}

And somewhere you just call:

myMagicLoop();

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please expand the idea behind return for this example ? Can you implement a quick example code ?? I just cant get it to work. –  NLed Feb 13 '12 at 11:37
    
@Fendi : I have updated my answer. Should be perfectly clear now. –  LihO Feb 13 '12 at 11:42
    
Thank you ! The I should stop if statement would return a value, this value can be used to terminate the loop or used in other if statements ? –  NLed Feb 13 '12 at 11:45
    
@Fendi : function myMagicLoop could return some value, then you would replace return; by return value; and yes, you would be able to use this value in code where you call this function: value = myMagicLoop(); if (value...) .... If it's what you ask. –  LihO Feb 13 '12 at 11:49
1  
@ChrisLutz: There are many people that consider using goto "acceptable" and there are also many people that rather change their code in order to avoid using it. Lets say I belong to the second group. –  LihO Feb 24 '12 at 10:13
show 8 more comments

This will switch between loop A and loop B.

for (;;)
{
    // Loop  A
    for (;;)
    {
        if WANT_TO_SWITCH
        {
            break;
        }

    }

    // Loop  B
    for (;;)
    {

        if WANT_TO_SWITCH
        {
            break;
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You use break; to break a loop and pass control beyond its closing brace. For example

for(;;) {
   if( whatever ) {
      break;
   }
}
//break gets you here
share|improve this answer
add comment

The "break" command should do what you need?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Alternatively you could consider rewriting this with an event-driven approach. This will of course depend on what your hardware is capable of, but at the very least you should be able to produce some timer events.

Then the code would go something like this:

static volatile bool sensor_1_ready;
static volatile bool sensor_2_ready;

for(;;)
{
  switch(state_machine)
  {
    case READING_SENSOR_1:
      if(sensor_2_ready)
      {
        state_machine = READING_SENSOR_2;
      }
      else if(sensor_1_ready)
      {
        process sensor 1
      }
      break;

    case READING_SENSOR_2:

      if(!sensor_2_ready && some_timeout_etc)
      {
        state_machine = READING_SENSOR_1;
      }
      else if(sensor_2_ready)
      {
        process sensor 2
      }
      break;
  }
}

void callback_sensor_1 (void)  // some sort of interrupt or callback function
{
  sensor_1_ready = true;
}

void callback_sensor_2 (void)  // some sort of interrupt or callback function
{
  sensor_2_ready = true;
}

(Before commenting on the volatile variables, please note that volatile is there to prevent dangerous compiler optimizations and not to serve as some mutex guard/atomic access/memory barrier etc.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thats helpful thank you :) I like how the case function was used here –  NLed Feb 13 '12 at 16:46
    
upvote for a different approach than break ;) –  Beatles1692 Feb 18 '12 at 23:00
add comment

The best way to do that is to change the for statement to something like:

for (; Sensor2 <= 20;) {
...

Alternatively you can change it from a for to a while statement:

while (Sensor2 <= 20) {
...

If that doesn't suite your needs you can always use a break instead.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Another option could be to use signals (SIGUSR1,SIGUSR2) to switch from one loop to another. Something of this sort:

void sensor2(int signum)
{
   for (; ;)
      ...
      /* Need to process sensor 1 now */
      kill(pid, SIGUSR1);
}

void sensor1(int signum)
{
    for (; ;)
      ...
      /* Need to process sensor 2 now */
      kill(pid, SIGUSR2);
}


int main()
{
   /* register the signal handlers */
   signal(SIGUSR1,  sensor1);
   signal(SIGUSR2,  sensor2);
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is this similar to using a semaphore ? –  NLed Feb 18 '12 at 23:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.