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i have an issue i am trying to solve without success. I have to copy part of a .txt file from the line n to the line n+y (let's say 1000 to 1000000). This file is very big so i can't do it manually, so i am trying to use the terminal to do it, without success. Right now i tried with operators and sed, without success. Here's the copy of what I tried:

sed -n "1000, 1000000p" path/first/file > path/second/file

Any help is really appreciated ;)

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1  
There's nothing wrong with the sed command you give in the example; in what way does it fail? –  William Pursell Feb 13 '12 at 12:29
    
If the input file has incorrect line endings, you will need to convert them first. Try dos2unix. –  tripleee Feb 14 '12 at 11:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

if you know how many lines are in your source file (wc -l) you can do this .. assume 12000 lines and you want lines 2000 - 7000 in your new file (total of 5000 lines).

cat myfile | tail -10000 | head -5000 > newfile

Read the last 10k lines, then read the 1st 5k lines from that.

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You do not need to know how many lines are in the file: simply put the head first. –  jfgagne Feb 13 '12 at 15:47
    
And if you want to put the tail first, you can use tail -n +2000. This also takes less buffer space. –  jfgagne Feb 13 '12 at 15:52
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Bling, Useless Use of Cat. Besides, the original sed command was just fine for this. –  tripleee Feb 14 '12 at 9:07
    
Thnx everybody for the answer, both the sed and the cad command worked ;). –  WarioBrega Mar 14 '12 at 18:02

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