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I'm trying to accomplish the following:

  1. Have a thread that reads data from a very large file say about 10GB and push them into the queue. (I do not wish for the queue to get very large either)

  2. While the buildQueue thread is pushing data to the queue at the same time have about 5 worker threads de-queue and process data.

I've made an attempt but my other threads are unreachable because of a continuous loop in my buildQueue thread.

My approach may be totally wrong. Thanks for any help, it's much appreciated.

Here's the code for buildQueue:

sub buildQueue {
    print "Enter a file name: ";
    my $dict_path = <STDIN>;
    chomp($dict_path);
    open DICT_FILE, $dict_path or die("Sorry, could not open file!");
    while (1) {
        if (<DICT_FILE>) {
            if ($queue->pending() < 100) {
                 my $query = <DICT_FILE>;
                 chomp($query);
                 $queue->enqueue($query);
                 my $count = $queue->pending();
                 print "Queue Size: $count Query: $query\n";
            }
        }
    }
}

And as I've expected when this thread gets executed nothing else after will be executed because this thread will not finish.

my $builder = new Thread(&buildQueue);

Since the builder thread will be running for a long time I never get to create worker threads.

Here's the entire code:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use Thread;
use Thread::Queue;


my $queue = new Thread::Queue();
my @threads;

sub buildQueue {
    print "Enter a file name: ";
    my $dict_path = <STDIN>;
    chomp($dict_path);
    open dict_file, $dict_path or die("Sorry, could not open file!");
    while (1) {
        if (<dict_file>) {
            if ($queue->pending() < 100) {
                 my $query = <dict_file>;
                 chomp($query);
                 $queue->enqueue($query);
                 my $count = $queue->pending();
                 print "Queue Size: $count Query: $query\n";
            }
        }
    }
}

sub processor {
    my $query;
    while (1) {
        if ($query = $queue->dequeue) {
            print "$query\n";
        }
    }
}

my $builder = new Thread(&buildQueue);
push @threads, new Thread(&processor) for 1..5;
share|improve this question
    
A couple of questions: You mention that your queue-builder thread will not finish, but does it do anything at all? Does the queue size ever dip below 100 or go above 0? Also, I'm not sure you're creating your threads correctly. Shouldn't it be my $builder=threads->create(\&buildQueue);? –  Jack Maney Feb 13 '12 at 11:57
    
Queue builder builds fine but since the worker threads were not reached to be created they cannot remove anything from the queue so the queue is stuck at 100 while the build queue is still running because of the continuous loop. –  Sinista Feb 13 '12 at 12:19
    
Hmmm, I'll need to see more code to establish context, especially where you create the threads. You aren't joining or detaching the queue builder before you create the worker threads, right? –  Jack Maney Feb 13 '12 at 12:20
    
I've posted up the complete code, of course processor will be doing more time-intensive job, I just haven't implemented it as yet. –  Sinista Feb 13 '12 at 12:40
    
The code you've pasted works ok for me on Ubuntu with perl 5.12.4 –  drnewman Feb 13 '12 at 12:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You'll need to mark when you want your threads to exit (via either joinor detach ). The fact that you have infinite loops with no last statements to break out of them is also a problem.

Edit: I also forgot a very important part! Each worker thread will block, waiting for another item to process off of the queue until they get an undef in the queue. Hence why we specifically enqueue undef once for each thread after the queue builder is done.

Try:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use threads;
use Thread::Queue;


my $queue = new Thread::Queue();
our @threads; #Do you really need our instead of my?

sub buildQueue
{
    print "Enter a file name: ";
    my $dict_path = <STDIN>;
    chomp($dict_path);

    #Three-argument open, please!
    open my $dict_file, "<",$dict_path or die("Sorry, could not open file!");
    while(my $query=<$dict_file>)
    {
        chomp($query);
        while(1)
        {   #Wait to see if our queue has < 100 items...
            if ($queue->pending() < 100) 
            {
                $queue->enqueue($query);
                print "Queue Size: " . $queue->pending . "\n";
                last; #This breaks out of the infinite loop
            }
        }
    }
    close($dict_file);
    foreach(1..5)
    {
        $queue->enqueue(undef);
    }
}

sub processor 
{
    my $query;
    while ($query = $queue->dequeue) 
    {
        print "Thread " . threads->tid . " got $query\n";
    }
}

my $builder=threads->create(\&buildQueue);
push @threads,threads->create(\&process) for 1..5;

#Waiting for our threads to finish.
$builder->join;
foreach(@threads)
{
    $_->join;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It seems that the problem was the deprecated Thread module I switched to the threads module instead and my code works as it should now. Thank you Jack Many for pointing me in the correct direction. –  Sinista Feb 13 '12 at 13:06

It sounds like this case could do with the Parallel::ForkManager module.

share|improve this answer
    
Would love to see the ForkManager solution if possible. –  Sinista Feb 14 '12 at 7:14

A different approach: You can also use user_tasks in MCE 1.2+ and create two multi-worker tasks, one task for reading (since it's a big file, you could also benefit from parallel reading while preserving file read seek) and one task for processing, etc.

The code below still uses Thread::Queue to manage your buffer queue.

The buildQueue sub has your queue size control and it pushes the data directly to the manager process' $R_QUEUE since we've used threads, so it has access to the parent's memory space. If you want to use forks instead, you can still access the queue through a call back function. But here I chose to simply just push to the queue.

The processQueue sub will simply de-queue whatever is in the queue until there's nothing more pending.

The task_end sub in each task is run only once by the manager process at the end of each task, so we use it to signal a stop to our worker processes.

Obviously, there's a lot of freedom in how you want to chunk your data to the workers, so you can decide upon the size of the chunk or even how to slurp your data in.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use threads;
use threads::shared;
use Thread::Queue;
use MCE;

my $R_QUEUE = Thread::Queue->new;
my $queue_workers = 8;
my $process_workers = 8;
my $chunk_size = 1;

print "Enter a file name: ";
my $input_file = <STDIN>;
chomp($input_file);

sub buildQueue {
    my ($self, $chunk_ref, $chunk_id) = @_;
    if ($R_QUEUE->pending() < 100) {
        $R_QUEUE->enqueue($chunk_ref);
        $self->sendto('stdout', "Queue Size: " . $R_QUEUE->pending ."\n");
    }
}

sub processQueue {
    my $self = shift;
    my $wid = $self->wid;
    while (my $buff = $R_QUEUE->dequeue) {
        $self->sendto('stdout', "Thread " . $wid . " got $$buff");
    }
}

my $mce = MCE->new(
    input_data => $input_file, # this could be a filepath or a file handle or even a scalar to treat like a file, check the documentation for more details.
    chunk_size => $chunk_size,
    use_slurpio => 1,

    user_tasks => [
        { # queueing task
            max_workers => $queue_workers,
            user_func => \&buildQueue,
            use_threads => 1, # we'll use threads to have access to the parent's variables in shared memory.
            task_end => sub { $R_QUEUE->enqueue( (undef) x $process_workers ) } # signal stop to our process workers when they hit the end of the queue. Thanks > Jack Maney!
        },
        { # process task
            max_workers => $process_workers,
            user_func => \&processQueue,
            use_threads => 1, # we'll use threads to have access to the parent's variables in shared memory
            task_end => sub { print "Finished processing!\n"; }
        }
    ]
);

$mce->run();

exit;
share|improve this answer

The MCE module for Perl loves big files. With MCE, one can chunk many lines at once, slurp a big chunk as a scalar string, or read 1 line at a time. Chunking many lines at once reduces the overhead for IPC.

MCE 1.504 is out now. It provides MCE::Queue with support for child processes including threads. In addition, the 1.5 release comes with 5 models (MCE::Flow, MCE::Grep, MCE::Loop, MCE::Map, and MCE::Stream) which take care of instantiating the MCE instance as well as auto-tuning max_workers and chunk_size. One may override these options btw.

Below, MCE::Loop is used for the demonstration.

use MCE::Loop;

print "Enter a file name: ";
my $dict_path = <STDIN>;
chomp($dict_path);

mce_loop_f {
   my ($mce, $chunk_ref, $chunk_id) = @_;

   foreach my $line ( @$chunk_ref ) {
      chomp $line;
      ## add your code here to process $line
   }

} $dict_path;

If you want to specify the number of workers and/or chunk_size, then there are 2 ways to do it.

use MCE::Loop max_workers => 5, chunk_size => 300000;

Or...

use MCE::Loop;

MCE::Loop::init {
   max_workers => 5,
   chunk_size  => 300000
};

Although chunking is preferred for large files, one can compare the time with chunking one line at a time. One may omit the first line inside the block (commented out). Notice how there's no need for an inner for loop. $chunk_ref is still an array ref containing 1 line. The input scalar $_ contains the line when chunk_size equals 1, otherwise points to $chunk_ref.

use MCE::Loop;

MCE::Loop::init {
   max_workers => 5,
   chunk_size  => 1
};

print "Enter a file name: ";
my $dict_path = <STDIN>;
chomp($dict_path);

mce_loop_f {
 # my ($mce, $chunk_ref, $chunk_id) = @_;

   my $line = $_;
   ## add your code here to process $line or $_

} $dict_path;

I hope that this demonstration was helpful for folks wanting to process a file in parallel.

:) mario

share|improve this answer

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