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In the process of attempting to convert my previously singleton-based-global-controller classes to more OOP friendly dependency injection method of passing the required methods from one object to another as they are needed. I've run into the problem where my previous class used a global object during its init.

(id)init 
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) 
    {
        [self setUpPhysicsWithWorld:FMPresenter.physics.world];
    }
    return self;
}

Where FMPresenter.physics returned a singleton physics object. Since my object cannot be instantiated correctly without a Physics object, a call to init is not valid. I have seen this being used:

(id) init 
{
    NSAssert(NO, @"init not allowed");
    [self release];
    return nil; 
}

(id) initWithPhysics:(FMPhysics*)physics 
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        [self setUpPhysicsWithWorld:physics.world];
    }
    return self;
}

Is this the preferred method to enforce constructor parameters in Objective-C?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes your solution is correct, the preferred way is to create another method that starts with init and to which you pass the required initialization parameters and return self, after a call to super.

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Thanks, I wasn't quite sure because I remembered Java didn't let you call the base constructor unless you either specified it or didn't specify any constructors at all. –  Aram Kocharyan Feb 13 '12 at 12:54

If it's possible for their to be a default FMPhysics object (not familiar with it), then another option would be for init to call initWithPhysics with a default physics world.

For example, here's an init overload with a db wrapper where the default init creates an in memory db which is a fine default.

- (id)init
{
    sqlite3 *db;
    sqlite3_open(":memory:", &db);
    return [self initWithDatabase:db];
}

- (id)initWithDatabase:(sqlite3*)database
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self)
    {
        _sqlite3 = database;      
    }

    return self;
}
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I thought of using [[FMPhysics] shared] but that was what I wanted to move away from :P –  Aram Kocharyan Feb 13 '12 at 12:55
    
cheers for the example –  Aram Kocharyan Feb 13 '12 at 12:55

The modern way to do this is to use NS_DESIGNATED_INITIALIZER in your .m:

@interface FMPresenter
- (instancetype)initWithPhysics:(FMPhysics*)physics NS_DESIGNATED_INITIALIZER;
@end

Also note the use of instancetype, which is now preferred over id.

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/releasenotes/ObjectiveC/ModernizationObjC/AdoptingModernObjective-C/AdoptingModernObjective-C.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40014150-CH1-SW8

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