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According to msdn : the commit syntax is :

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However when I omit the tran/transaction words - it does compile and run with NO errors.enter image description here

How can it be working ?

Does it do something else instead ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The COMMIT in question is not actually COMMIT you think. See COMMIT WORK

COMMIT [ WORK ] [ ; ]

Remarks

This statement functions identically to COMMIT TRANSACTION, except COMMIT TRANSACTION accepts a user-defined transaction name. This COMMIT syntax, with or without specifying the optional keyword WORK, is compatible with SQL-92.

So COMMIT by itself is COMMIT WORK which is identical to COMMIT TRANSACTION.
Ditto for ROLLBACK [ WORK ]

After comment,

BEGIN TRANSACTION gbn
SELECT 1
COMMIT gbn -- fail
GO
BEGIN TRANSACTION gbn
SELECT 2
COMMIT TRAN gbn -- works
GO
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except COMMIT TRANSACTION accepts a user-defined transaction name.... but i didnt give him the name of the Transaction... thats the problem. + Im not talking about the WORK keyword. im talking about commit vs commit trans. –  Royi Namir Feb 13 '12 at 13:41
    
@Royi Namir: no, COMMIT by itself means COMMIT WORK. Nothing to do with a named transaction: if you did name it, you didn't mention that in your question. And with a name, you'd have to explicitly use COMMIT TRANSACTION SomeName or COMMIT TRAN SomeName. Not COMMIT by itself –  gbn Feb 13 '12 at 13:44
    
So if i dont use any named transaction I can always use Commit alone. right ? –  Royi Namir Feb 13 '12 at 13:47
1  
@RoyiNamir: correct –  gbn Feb 13 '12 at 13:49

This might help:

I think it should be like this:

BEGIN TRAN
    --statement
IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
    ROLLBACK;
ELSE
    COMMIT TRAN;
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