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I want to sort an ArrayList<String> but the problem is my native language characters - my alphabet is like this: a, ą, b, c, č, d, e, f ... z, ž. As you see z character is second from the end and ą is second in alphabet, so after I sort my array it is sorted incorrectly. All my native language characters are moved to the end of array. Example:

package lt;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;

public class test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<String> items = new ArrayList<>();
        items.add("bbc");
        items.add("ąbc");
        items.add("abc");
        items.add("zzz");

        System.out.println("Unsorted: ");
        for(String str : items) {
            System.out.println(str);
        }

        Collections.sort(items);
        System.out.println();

        System.out.println("Sorted: ");
        for(String str : items) {
            System.out.println(str);
        }
    }
}

Output:

Unsorted: 
bbc
ąbc
abc
zzz

Sorted: 
abc
bbc
zzz
ąbc

Should be:

Sorted:
abc
ąbc
bbc
zzz
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1  
See this question –  Banthar Feb 13 '12 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You should use Collator class.

For example

Locale lithuanian = new Locale("lt_LT");
Collator lithuanianCollator = Collator.getInstance(lithuanian);

And then sort the collection using this collator

Collections.sort(theList, lithuanianCollator);
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My country is Lithuania, and language is Lithuanian, what should I do, because if I am correct my Language is not supported by Locale class? –  Minutis Feb 13 '12 at 13:39
2  
This answer is correct, but there's no need to create a Comparator — Collator is already an instance of Comparator. Collections.sort(myList, Collator.getInstance(Locale.FRENCH)); is complete code. –  Sean Reilly Feb 13 '12 at 13:43
1  
Collator is-a Comparator by design. Creating another Comparator is unecessary. –  Buhake Sindi Feb 13 '12 at 13:44
2  
If your language isn't supported by Locale, then you're in trouble. Fortunately, according to this: oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/javase7locales-334809.html Lithuanian is supported by Locale in java 7. Since there isn't a constant, you'll need to construct an instance of Locale yourself: Locale lithuanian = new Locale("lt_LT"); –  Sean Reilly Feb 13 '12 at 13:46
    
@SeanReilly, Elite - thanks, I didn't know it. Minutis - please see Sean's response. –  Vic Feb 13 '12 at 13:48

You can use Collator to do locale sensitive String comparisions.

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Thanks, but the above answer is more improved, thought you are right. –  Minutis Feb 13 '12 at 13:56

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