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I am trying to implement a function (let's call it scan) that takes three arguments. The first is a two argument procedure, the second is the initial value for the procedure, and the third is a list of items to process using the procedure. For example:

(scan + 0 '())==> '()
(scan + 0 '(1))==> '(1)
(scan + 0 '(1 2 3 4 5));; 1+0, 2+1+0, 3+2+1+0, ...==> '(1 3 6 10 15)

and so on... I have coded something for finding the prefix sum that takes two arguments. I tried using that but it didn't work. How can I approach this problem?

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Are you familiar with writing map? –  dyoo Feb 13 '12 at 14:12
    
@dyoo: this is not homework. I really don't appreciate you tagging it that way. –  sara hamedani Feb 13 '12 at 22:06
    
Apologies; I don't mean to insult. It's that the presented problem wouldn't be out of place as a list homework exercise. –  dyoo Feb 13 '12 at 22:11

3 Answers 3

Think recursively.

scan proc val list = if null list
                        then the result is an empty list
                        else the car of the result is (proc val (car list))
                             and the cdr of the result is scan proc newval (cdr list)

where newval is car result (you can't say car result, of course, you have to express it differently). If you can read Haskell, looking at the source of scanl will be instructive.

Ah, not homework, so then:

(define (scan proc val list)
    (if (null? list)
        '()
        (cons (proc val (car list)) (scan proc (proc val (car list)) (cdr list)))))
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Oh, wait, that's what I have, it works here with guile, is racket much different? –  Daniel Fischer Feb 13 '12 at 22:19
    
oh I see yes I am using racket and I get the following: (scan cons '() '(1 2 3 4 5)) '((() . 1) ((() . 1) . 2) (((() . 1) . 2) . 3) ((((() . 1) . 2) . 3) . 4) (((((() . 1) . 2) . 3) . 4) . 5)) –  sara hamedani Feb 13 '12 at 22:21
    
where as it should theoretically be ((1) (2 1) (3 2 1)... –  sara hamedani Feb 13 '12 at 22:22
    
But that's correct, that's what scan cons should produce. What did you expect? (By the way, let's delete a couple of our comments, the site doesn't like discussions in comments.) –  Daniel Fischer Feb 13 '12 at 22:23
    
oh I assumed it would produce a clean version of ((1) (2 1) (3 2 1) (4 3 2 1)...) –  sara hamedani Feb 13 '12 at 22:24

Since this was tagged racket here is a version that uses the for/fold form:

(define (scan f seed ls)
  (define-values (discard results)
    (for/fold ([seed seed]
               [results null]) ([elem (in-list ls)])
      (let ([next-seed (f elem seed)])
        (values next-seed
                (cons next-seed results)))))

  (reverse results))
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(define (scan f i l)
  (if (empty? l) l (cons (f i (first l)) (scan f i(rest l)))))
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