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I am new to objective-c, and start with iOS5 (with no prior knowledge of iOS4). I have trouble understanding the difference between strong and weak storage, read the documentation, and other SO questions, but still they sound identical to me.

I read the documentation: Transitioning To ARC - it references to iOS4 terms of retain, assign, and release, which confuses me. Then I look into Open U CS193p where it differentiates strong and weak:

Strong: "keep this in the heap until I don't point to it anymore"
Weak: "keep this as long as someone else points to it strongly"

Aren't the two definition identical = if pointer no longer pointing to an object, then free the memory holding the object? I understand the concept of pointers, heap, allocation or deallocation of memory - but what's the difference between strong and weak?

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The memory management model is still relevant even though you are using ARC. You still have to understand reference counting, you just don't have to do it manually. So your last paragraph is an unreasonable demand. –  jrturton Feb 13 '12 at 14:56
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The difference is that an object will be deallocated as soon as there are no strong pointers to it. Even if weak pointers point to it, once the last strong pointer is gone, the object will be deallocated, and all remaining weak pointers will be zeroed out.

Perhaps an example is in order.

Imagine our object is a dog, and that the dog wants to run away (be deallocated).

Strong pointers are like a leash on the dog. As long as you have the leash attached to the dog, the dog will not run away. If five people attach their leash to one dog, (five strong pointers to one object), then the dog will not run away until all five leashes are detached.

Weak pointers, on the other hand, are like little kids pointing at the dog and saying "Look! A dog!" As long as the dog is still on the leash, the little kids can still see the dog, and they'll still point to it. As soon as all the leashes are detached, though, the dog runs away no matter how many little kids are pointing to it.

As soon as the last strong pointer (leash) no longer points to an object, the object will be deallocated, and all weak pointers will be zeroed out.

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Nice. Hillegass? –  jrturton Feb 13 '12 at 15:10
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It's based off an analogy Malcom Crawford at Apple gave a few years back. Don't know where he got it. –  BJ Homer Feb 13 '12 at 15:14
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+1 excellent example. it's a derivative of Hillegass's example on how leashes are retain/release, but I love this adaptation for strong/weak. –  Dave DeLong Feb 13 '12 at 15:32
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@DaveDeLong: Well, they're illegal on 10.6 with ARC. You can't use them at all. So that's kinda an irrelevant point. –  BJ Homer Feb 13 '12 at 15:43
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Another good one is Helium balloons: as long as at least one string is held, it's not going to float away. The leash/balloon analogies are also good at getting people to forget that "ownership" is managed by retain/release. –  Steve Weller Feb 13 '12 at 15:44
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Aren't the two definition identical.

Absolutely not. The key difference in the two definitions that you've pointed out is the "as long as someone else". It's the "someone else" that is important.

Consider the following:

__strong id strongObject = <some_object>;
__weak id weakObject = strongObject;

Now we've got a two pointers to <some_object>, one strong and one weak. If we set strongObject to nil like so:

strongObject = nil;

Then if you go through the rules you outlined then you'll ask yourself these questions:

  1. Strong: "keep this in the heap until I don't point to it anymore"

    strongObject doesn't point to <some_object> any more. So we don't need to keep it.

  2. Weak: "keep this as long as someone else points to it strongly"

    weakObject still points to <some_object>. But since nobody else points to it, this rule also means that we don't need to keep it.

The result is that <some_object> is deallocated and if your runtime supports it (Lion and iOS 5 upwards) then weakObject will automatically be set to nil.

Now consider what happens if we set weakObject to nil like so:

weakObject = nil;

Then if you go through the rules you outlined then you'll ask yourself these questions:

  1. Strong: "keep this in the heap until I don't point to it anymore"

    strongObject does point to <some_object>. So we do need to keep it.

  2. Weak: "keep this as long as someone else points to it strongly"

    weakObject doesn't point to <some_object>.

The result is that <some_object> is not deallocated, but weakObject will be the nil pointer.

[Note that all that is assuming <some_object> is not pointed to by another strong reference somewhere else / some other means of being "held"]

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So the main difference between strong and weak is that deallocation of objects being pointed at strongly will automatically nil-out all related weak pointers. And for a weak pointer to point to something, there always exist a strong pointer. If so, the main application object has to be strongly pointed to? –  KMC Feb 13 '12 at 15:29
    
For a weak pointer to point to something valid then yes there must be a strong pointer. Add to that the fact that iOS 5 and Lion support auto-nilling of weak references and you get what you say. iOS 4's runtime does not support that though. The "main application object" I assume you mean the UIApplication object? That will be strongly referenced by the inner workings of UIKit - but you don't need to worry about that. –  mattjgalloway Feb 13 '12 at 15:48
    
I think you can use the word like as "strongObjectPointer" instead of "strongObject". So New people to programming will have better meaning. Nice catch on @BJ Homer post Mr.Matt.Interesting:) –  Vijay-Apple-Dev.blogspot.com Jul 6 '13 at 15:25
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No, they aren't identical but very different. You use strong only if you need to retain the object. You use weak on any other case, with de advantage that you can know if object ha been removed from heap because nobody is retaining it.

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