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I have

body {
    background: url(images/background.svg);
}

The desired effect is that this background image will have width equal to that of the page, height changing to maintain the proportion. e.g. if the original image happens to be 100*200 (any units) and the body is 600px wide, the background image should end up being 1200px high. The height should change automatically if the window is resized. Is this possible?

At the moment, Firefox looks like it's making the height fit and then adjusting the width. Is this perhaps because the height is the longest dimension and it's trying to avoid cropping? I want to crop vertically, then scroll: no horizontal repeat.

Also, Chrome is placing the image in the centre, no repeat, even when background-repeat:repeat is given explicitly, which is the default anyway.

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Does html, body { height: 100%; } help? Also, cough. –  thirtydot Feb 13 '12 at 15:27
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4 Answers 4

up vote 95 down vote accepted

There is a CSS3 property for this, namely background-size (compatibility check). While one can set length values, it's usually used with the special values contain and cover. In your specific case, you should use cover:

body {
    background-image:  url(images/background.svg);
    background-size:   cover;                      /* <------ */
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
}

Eggsplanation for contain and cover

Sorry for the bad pun, but I'm going to use the picture of the day by Biswarup Ganguly for demonstration. Lets say that this is your screen, and the gray area is outside of your visible screen. For demonstration, I'm going to assume a 16x9 ratio.

screen

We want to use the aforementioned picture of the day as a background. However, we cropped the image to 4x3 for some reason. We could set the background-size property to some fixed length, but we will focus on contain and cover. Note that I also assume that we didn't mangle the width and/or height of body.

contain

contain

Scale the image, while preserving its intrinsic aspect ratio (if any), to the largest size such that both its width and its height can fit inside the background positioning area.

This makes sure that the background image is always completely contained in the background positioning area, however, there could be some empty space filled with your background-color in this case:

contain

cover

cover

Scale the image, while preserving its intrinsic aspect ratio (if any), to the smallest size such that both its width and its height can completely cover the background positioning area.

This makes sure that the background image is covering everything. There will be no visible background-color, however depending on the screen's ratio a great part of your image could be cut off:

cover

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This is exactly what I want, thanks. It doesn't seem to work in Chrome (or Chromium, at least) -- got any bright ideas? –  spraff Feb 14 '12 at 12:40
    
According to quirksmode.org/css/contents.html#t44 it should work in Chrome without any prefix. However, have you tried the -webkit- prefix? –  Zeta Feb 14 '12 at 12:54
    
Thanks Zeta! doig.com.au –  Steve May 24 '13 at 12:05
3  
Yauhen's answer (at the bottom of this page) was actually what I was looking for: background-size: contain –  Danny Beckett Jul 18 '13 at 2:30
    
@DannyBeckett: While this is possible, it isn't what the OP was looking for: "I want to crop vertically, then scroll: no horizontal repeat." –  Zeta Jul 18 '13 at 4:09
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Based on tips from https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/background-size I end up with the following recipe that worked for me

body {
        overflow-y: hidden ! important;
        overflow-x: hidden ! important;
        background-color: #f8f8f8;
        background-image: url('index.png');
        /*background-size: cover;*/
        background-size: contain;
        background-repeat: no-repeat;
        background-position: right;
}
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Although I used background-position: center;, this did work better for me than backgound-size: cover;. –  Nate Apr 26 '13 at 4:50
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I'm not sure what you're looking for exactly, but you really should check out these excellent blog posts written by Chris Coyier from CSS-Tricks:

http://css-tricks.com/how-to-resizeable-background-image/

http://css-tricks.com/perfect-full-page-background-image/

Read the descriptions for each of the articles and see if they're what you're looking for.

The first answers the following question:

Is there a way to make a background image resizeable? As in, fill the background of a web page edge-to-edge with an image, no matter the size of the browser window. Also, have it resize larger or smaller as the browser window changes. Also, make sure it retains its ratio (doesn't stretch weird). Also, doesn't cause scrollbars, just cuts off vertically if it needs to. Also, comes in on the page as an inline tag.

The second post's goal is to get the following, a "background image on a website that covers the entire browser window at all times. "

Hope this helps.

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I had the same issue, unable to resize the image when adjusting browser dimensions.

Bad Code:

html {  
  background-color: white;  
  background-image: url("example.png");  
  background-repeat: no-repeat;  
  background-attachment: scroll;  
  background-position: 0% 0%;
}


Good Code:

html {  
  background-color: white;  
  background-image: url("example.png");  
  background-repeat: no-repeat;  
  background-attachment: scroll;  
  background-position: 0% 0%;
  background-size: contain;
}

The key here is the addition of this element -> background-size: contain;

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