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This program is written in C++. I am trying to use a void function to expand a Line structure which consists of an integer length and a pointer to the next connected line. There is a void Expand function made to assign a line reference to the line pointer in the struct. The new line is to be double the size of the current line. With the code I am using, I get a g++ error of 'Taking address of temporary [-fpermissive]'. Could anyone suggest a way in which the function adds a valid instance of a line reference to the Line pointer nextLine?

struct Line
{
    int length;
    Line* nextLine;
};

Line NewLine(Line& lineRef)
{
    Line newLine;
    newLine.length = lineRef.length * 2;
    return newLine;
}

void Expand(Line& lineRef)
{
    //Error here states: Taking address of temporary [-fpermissive]
    lineRef.nextLine = &NewLine(lineRef);
}

int main() {

    Line line;

    Expand(line);

    cout << line.length << endl;
    cout << line.nextLine->length << endl;

    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This one works

    struct Line
    {
            int length;
            Line* nextLine;
            ~Line(){delete nextLine;}
             //Make copy constructor and assignment operator private
    };

    void Expand(Line* lineRef)
    {
            lineRef->nextLine = new Line;
            lineRef->nextLine->length = 2*(lineRef->length) ;
    }

int main() 
{

        Line* line = new Line;
        line->length = 5;

        Expand(line);

        cout << line->length << endl;
        cout << line->nextLine->length << endl;

        delete line;
        return 0;
}
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Please... don't! This does not work. It appear to work in this toy sample but will crash horribly if you ever copy Line because the nextLine pointer will be copied, but not the content it points to, and then the runtime will attempt to call delete twice on the same pointer. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 16:26
    
What's wrong with it? –  sank Feb 13 '12 at 16:29
    
Yes, the copy constructor and assignment operator should make a deep copy or they should be made private. –  sank Feb 13 '12 at 16:37
    
or, more simply, the ownership of the pointer should be handed over to a smart pointer. std::unique_ptr in C++11. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 17:44
    
@MatthieuM., I don't quite understand how that will work. Could you elaborate more or post a link to an example? –  sank Feb 13 '12 at 20:57

You're trying to implement a linked list, but you don't understand manual memory management yet.

The short-term solution is to use std::list<Line>. There's already a solution that works, and you don't need to bother with the behind-the-scenes stuff.

The long-term solution also is to use std::list<Line>. No need to re-invent the wheel, even if you're a seasoned developer and know how to.

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I would rather recommend vector as the basic data structure than list. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 16:29
    
@MatthieuM.: Because...? In the absence of any performance requirements, which we certainly can't infer from the code snippet found in the question, list<> is as good a container as vector<>. –  Darryl Feb 13 '12 at 21:59
    
@Darryl: Because Stroustrup said so ? vector is the default choice of container. Unless you have requirements indicating another data structure, use a vector. It is easy to use and it offers the most functionalities among Sequence containers, up to C-compatibility (which is important for beginners as unfortunately tutorials often have a sickening amount of C-isms...) –  Matthieu M. Feb 14 '12 at 7:21
2  
The code from the question implemented a linked list; I didn't intend to change that. If it had been a problem with a Line[N], I'd recommend std::vector. –  MSalters Feb 14 '12 at 7:55

The problem with the line:

lineRef.nextLine = &NewLine(lineRef);

is what the compiler is telling you. You are taking the address of a temporary. What it means is that after the ; is reached, the temporary NewLine(lineRef) will be destroyed and the pointer lineRef.nextLine will be pointer to a dead object.


Update: how to make it work.

It depends on what you want to do. If what you want is to have a list then the simplest thing is using a prepacked list data structure (std::list<Line>) rather than rolling your own implementation of list.

If you really want to implement your own list, then you will need to dynamically allocate the next node (this will make the compiler happy) and you will need to add code to manage the list (proper construction of the Line object that initializes the fields, including copy-construction, destructors to manage the dynamic memory, probably some helper functions to walk the list (or iterators to be able to use algorithms...) Just don't bother and use std::list.

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OP also asked how to make the code work. –  Mooing Duck Feb 13 '12 at 16:00
1  
I would rather recommend vector as the basic data structure than list. –  Matthieu M. Feb 13 '12 at 16:29

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