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I am working on a project that parses an incoming text file. I am learning C# as I go. My current method for picking out the information I need is something like:

string MyMatchString = @"a pattern to match";
Match MyMatch = Regex.Match(somestringinput, MyMatchString);
if (MyMatch.Succes)
{
   DoSomething(MyMatch.Value);
}

I am doing a lot of that. I'd like to be able to combine the match and the test for success in one step. Looking through the Class listings, Regex has an IsMatch() method, but it doesn't appear that I can access the matched value (assuming it is successful). I think I need a Match instance for that. I tried

if ((Match MyMatch = Regex.Match(somestringinput, MyMatchString).Success)

but of course got a compile error.

I am thinking a static method that takes the match pattern and the input then returns a bool is the way to go. Then I can just test for success, and if so grab the matched value.

share|improve this question
    
So you answered your own question... –  Tudor Feb 13 '12 at 16:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well you can write an extension method for Regex which would give you some power. The trick is doing it without running the regex match twice, which could be a problem for your performance (note: this hasn't been tested, and it differs from your idea in that it requires a ready-made Regex object to work).

public static class RegexExtensions {
    public static bool GetMatch(this Regex regex, string input, out string matched) {
        Match match = regex.Match(input);
        if (match.Success) {
            matched = match.Value;
            return true;
        }
        matched = null;
        return false;
    }
}

So you'd do something like

string matched;
Regex regex = new Regex(pattern);
if (regex.GetMatch(inputstring, matched))
{ /* do something with 'matched' */ }
else
{ /* no match, 'matched' is null */ }

You might prefer to just return null in the failure case and the string otherwise and dispense with the boolean and the output parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This seems the most elegant approach, although it changes the semantics of the original code slightly. It's a shame that static extension methods cannot be defined. –  Tudor Feb 13 '12 at 16:18
    
Good suggestion. One problem I can see with this approach is that all you get from the Match is a single string value. That may be OK for certain use cases, but it's not very flexible. What if he wants two values from the regex? –  John M Gant Feb 13 '12 at 16:35
    
Something like this approach is what I was thinking. I can tweak this with a foreach and return a list of strings for multiple matches. Either that or overload for a MatchCollection. I was also going to test for a bool return value instead of returning a string because C# passes reference types by reference. I wold also pass in a Match instead of a RegEx. If the return type is bool and I run this method and the match is successful, the match that is passed in is changed to point to the result of the match, no? –  David Green Feb 13 '12 at 17:10
    
This suggestion is what I went with. I tweaked it a little so the definition of the method looks like: public static bool GetMatch(out Match match, string input, string pattern) this way I can just test for the bool true or false value in one test but still have access to the matched value, if any. –  David Green Feb 13 '12 at 22:32

You can use foreach

string MyMatchString = @"a pattern to match";
foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(somestringinput, MyMatchString))
{
    DoSomething(match.Value);
}

Optionally add break if you want only one match (or use .Take(1))

share|improve this answer

You could implement the "Try" convention used by TryParse and TryGetValue.

public static bool TryMatch(string input, string pattern, out Match match)
{
    var m = Regex.Match(input, pattern);
    if(m.Success)
    {
        match = m;
    }
    return m.Success;
}

// usage
string myMatchString = @"a pattern to match"; 
Match result = null;
if(TryMatch(somestringinput, myMatchString, out result))
{
    DoSomething(result.Value);
}

Alternatively, you can create higher-order functions that accept Action and Func delegates.

public void ActionOnMatch(string input, string pattern, Action<string> action)
{
    var m = Regex.Match(input, pattern);
    if(m.Success)
    {
        action(m.Value);
    }
}

public TResult FuncOnMatch<TResult>(string input, string pattern, 
    Func<string, TResult> func)
{
    var m = Regex.Match(input, pattern);
    if(m.Success)
    {
        return func(m.Value);
    }
    else
    {
        return default(TResult);
    }
}

/// usage
string pattern = @"a pattern to match"; 
ActionOnMatch(input, pattern, DoSomething);
var result = FuncOnMatch<string>(input, pattern, (val) => val);
share|improve this answer

Do you mean something like the following:

// static method that returns a bool
if (Regex.IsMatch(somestringinput, somestringpattern))
{
    // grab the matched value
    Match match = Regex.Match(somestringinput, somestringpattern);
    DoSomething(match.Value)
}

Does this answer your question? Is there a particular reason why you want to combine everything into one line?

share|improve this answer
1  
This will execute the regex twice –  sehe Feb 13 '12 at 16:09
    
Is there a reason to combine everything in one line? This particular section of code I am matching all told 10 matches. Other places I am matching 5 or 6. Testing for a simple true (or a null) takes one statement and makes for neater code. –  David Green Feb 13 '12 at 17:59

If you just want an answer as a boolean value and dont want to store it dont use a variable match to store it. You can just use Regex.Match to get the boolean value you want like this:

if (Regex.Match("a", MyMatchString).Success) { };
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just use IsMatch in that case? –  John M Gant Feb 13 '12 at 16:30
    
True he can use that too. –  NoviceMe Feb 13 '12 at 21:03

Creating the Match, testing for success and using the results are separate steps, by design. There might be ways around that, but you'd be fighting the framework, and possibly making your code a little less readable for other developers.

If you're parsing a file, you might consider an alternate approach using Linq. Depending on exactly what you mean by DoSomething, this might at least make the code a little less tedious.

Regex re = new Regex(@"(?<prop1>pattern part 1)(?<prop2>pattern part 2)");

var goodLines = 
    from line in File.ReadAllLines(inputFile)
    let m = re.Match(line)
    where m.Success
    select new {
        Prop1 = m.Groups["prop1"].ToString(),
        Prop2 = m.Groups["prop2"].ToString()
    }

foreach (var goodLine in goodLines) {
    DoSomething(goodLine);
}

Here we're defining named capture groups within the regex, and using those named captures to populate an anonymous type. Then we're looping over the collection of those anonymous objects returned by the Linq expression.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about LINQ but in this section of the file I have 3 matches that I search for. If I find one, then I do 1 of 3 different things, all of which include more matches. I could (and have) written monster matches for each one of the 3, but those are difficult to get right for patterns, especially some that might or might not be there. –  David Green Feb 13 '12 at 17:18
    
Once I find a top level pattern, there are sub-level patterns to match. So writing a Regex to match 20 lines while possible probably isn't a good idea. Separate LINQ statements doesn't guarantee the sub-level matches will correspond to the top level. –  David Green Feb 13 '12 at 17:31

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