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trying to figure out how to write the following in CoffeeScript:

var foo = new function()
{

    var $this = this;

    $("#foo").click( this.clicked );

    this.clicked = function()
    {
        $this.alert( $(this).text() );
    };

    this.alert = function(message)
    {
        alert(message);
    };

};

Unfortunately I can't figure out for the life of me how in CoffeeScript I access the class pointer, "this" is obviously not context aware and will often just point to the variable passed by the callee. So there's no way for me to write the above script in CoffeeScript.

Any advice? I can't find anything useful in the documentation, you have the @ pointers but they also just use the "this" pointer from the current context, making it useless..

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can add methods directly to @ in the constructor to achieve the same effect:

class C
    constructor: ->
        $this = @
        @clicked = ->
            console.log @
            $this.alert 'pancakes'
    alert: (m) ->
        console.log m

c = new C
c.clicked()
c.clicked.call window​​​​​

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/Y8ZBe/

You'd usually be able to use a bound method and an "event" argument in situations like this though:

class C
    clicked: (ev) =>
        @alert(ev.target.value)
    alert: (m) ->
        console.log m

c = new C
c.clicked(target: { value: 'pancakes' })
c.clicked.call window, target: { value: 'pancakes' }

This sort of thing usually turns up in jQuery (or similar) callbacks and they usually have an event argument which explicitly identifies the target "this" so that you can use bound functions.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/LafV2/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I had tried something similar to what you did in the first option, except I did not think to use the constructor. Still it's a hack to achieve something CS should support natively.. which is a shame.. :\ –  Naatan Feb 13 '12 at 17:59
    
@Naatan it's not a hack. You can use plain constructor functions or prototypes in coffeescript. –  Ricardo Tomasi Feb 13 '12 at 22:30
    
I meant it's a hack in the sense that you are using the language in a way that it was not intended. –  Naatan Feb 14 '12 at 18:12

CoffeeScript is still javascript. The limitations of this still apply. You can obviously write a straight translation:

foo = ->
    self = this
    @clicked = ->
        self.alert $(this).text()
    @alert = (message) ->
        alert message
    $('#foo').click @clicked

Yet you should be using prototypes (even in javascript). With the fat arrow => you can bind the function to it's current context (but then you lose the element reference):

foo = ->
    $('#foo').click (e) =>
        @clicked(e.target)

foo::clicked = (el) ->
    @alert $(el).text()

foo::alert = (message) ->
    alert message

Or using the class abstraction (nothing more than prototype usage wrapped up in a prettier package) and jQuery.proxy:

class Foo
    constructor: ->
        $('#foo').click $.proxy @clicked, this
    clicked: (e) ->
        @alert $(e.target).text()
    alert: (message) ->
        alert message

$.proxy @clicked, this could be replaced with @clicked.bind @ on modern browsers/engines (see Function.prototype.bind).

share|improve this answer
    
Class abstraction fails when you start adding functions inside objects though. The point being that there is no class pointer that is accessible anywhere within the class, unless you define one yourself, in which case you're partly defying the very purpose of the language. –  Naatan Feb 14 '12 at 18:14
    
@Naatan: But wouldn't that make your JavaScript version a hack as well? After all, you're adding functions directly to an object and there's no class-ish thing in sight. I'm not trying to start a fight here, every language has its ugly little corners of kludgy nonsense and there's usually a standard idiom (or ten) for dealing with those corners. –  mu is too short Feb 14 '12 at 18:38
    
@muistooshort you're right.. JavaScript has taught me some bad habits. –  Naatan Feb 14 '12 at 18:52

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