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This problem has bothered me for a while and Im sure theres some sort of technicality which stops this from being possible, but is there a way to find which Javascript file is linked to a button?

So when I press a submit button and it triggers a Javascript event, I need to find the code which is being triggered rather than trawling through every link in the head of the html trying to find

"jQuery('submitBtn').click(..."

Im using Firebug and sometimes Chrome's console.

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you can use fireDiff addons.mozilla.org/fr/firefox/addon/firediff –  mgraph Feb 13 '12 at 16:19
    
breakpoints are your friends. They work in Chrome/Safari, Firefox and Opera. –  c69 Feb 13 '12 at 16:22
    
@c69 I'm not sure how well they would work here, since typically you set the breakpoint on an interesting line in the source. So you have a chicken-and-egg issue if need to find the handler's source to begin with. –  Andrzej Doyle Feb 13 '12 at 16:25
    
You can use the profiler.. –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Feb 13 '12 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use Visual Event 2 which tells you the source file and line number (i think it works on chrome)

Visual Event is an open source Javascript bookmarklet which provides debugging information about events that have been attached to DOM elements. Visual Event shows:

  • Which elements have events attached to them
  • The type of events attached to an element
  • The code that will be run with the event is triggered
  • The source file and line number for where the attached function was defined (Webkit browsers and Opera only)
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+1. It's a great tool, and I didn't even realise it gave you the line number in Chrome (much better than in ffx, where it gives you the text of the function that you can then use to search for the line) –  wheresrhys Feb 13 '12 at 16:38
    
+1 Thats pretty awesome. Saves time, although it can never seem to find the definition which contains the code by itself –  JackalopeZero Feb 13 '12 at 16:41
    
@JackalopeZero on chrome it tells me the file and the line –  Nicola Peluchetti Feb 17 '12 at 13:54

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