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I've unintentionally committed some confidential files to a bzr branch. What's even more sticky is that I also pushed them to launchpad.

I made a bzr revert but, if I go to that dirty revision, I can still see those files. Is it possible to completely return to a previous revision, so that those files completely disappear?

Or as an alternative, if I delete the trunk branch of a launchpad project, will I be able to create a new trunk?

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This question is essentially a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2262203/… –  Adam Glauser Feb 13 '12 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

If you delete the trunk branch of a launchpad you will be able to create a new trunk.

You can also completely go back to the previous revision by using "bzr push --overwrite -rREVNO" where REVNO is the revision you want to go back to.

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Thank you jelmer. However unfortunately this doesn't work. If I try bzr push --overwrite -r X, it says No new revisions to push. and no change happens. –  Attila Fulop Feb 14 '12 at 12:30
    
Ok, in conjunction with TridenT's solution it worked. Thank you –  Attila Fulop Feb 14 '12 at 12:51

You can do a uncommit. For the user, this will remove it from the branch. In the bzr repo, it will in fact unlink the revision from the main line.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

So according to TridenT's and jelmer's recommendations the solution is:

1.) `bzr uncommit -r X` Where X is the revision I want to return to
2.) `bzr commit` This created the local revision X+1
3.) `bzr push --overwrite -r X+1` This pushed the stuff to launchpad,

and all those sticky files are gone.

Thank you guys.

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+1 for adding the complete solution (with credit!) –  TridenT Mar 24 '13 at 9:29

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