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I would like to do this:

data Foo n = Foo $(tuple n Integer)

and thus allow

x :: Foo 3
x = Foo (1, 2, 3)

y :: Foo 5
y = Foo (5, 4, 3, 2, 1)

Currently I have simply

data Foo = Foo [Integer]

which can be made to work, but throws away a lot of nice compile-time checking. I'll be making a few different Foo data objects, and each will have a fixed number of foos throughout its lifespan, and it feels silly to not be able to check that in the type system.

Is this possible in haskell?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How about

data IntAnd b = Int :. b
infixr 5 :.

So that way you can do

data Foo n = Foo n

x :: Foo (IntAnd (IntAnd Int))
x = Foo (3 :. 4 :. 5)

y :: Foo (IntAnd (IntAnd (IntAnd (IntAnd Int))))
y = Foo (5 :. 4 :. 3 :. 2 :. 1)

Or, if you want something a bit closer to your original syntax, try TypeFamilies:

data One 
data Succ a
type Two = Succ One 
type Three = Succ Two 
type Four = Succ Three
type Five = Succ Four

class NTuple a where
  type IntTuple a

instance NTuple One where
  type IntTuple One = Int 

instance (NTuple a) => NTuple (Succ a) where
  type IntTuple (Succ a) = IntAnd (IntTuple a)

x :: Foo (IntTuple Three)
x = Foo (3 :. 4 :. 5)

y :: Foo (IntTuple Five)
y = Foo (5 :. 4 :. 3 :. 2 :. 1)

Or with even more magic (TypeOperators, MultiParamTypeClasses, and FlexibleInstance, oh my!):

data a :. b = a :. b
infixr 5 :.

class NTuple a b where
  type HomoTuple a b

instance NTuple One b where
  type HomoTuple One b = b

instance (NTuple a b) => NTuple (Succ a) b where
  type HomoTuple (Succ a) b = b :. HomoTuple a b

x :: Foo (HomoTuple Three Int)
x = Foo ( 3 :. 4 :. 5 )

y :: Foo (HomoTuple Five Int)
y = Foo ( 1 :. 2 :. 3 :. 4 :. 5 )
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Not quite correct, as you need the Foo constructor on x and y. –  Louis Wasserman Feb 13 '12 at 17:11
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Instead of tuples, use fixed-length vectors. See f.e. http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/haskell/2005-May/015815.html.

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Exactly what I was looking for. (Note that the answers below are also correct, but this library is a useful encapsulation of the same techniques.) –  So8res Feb 13 '12 at 18:20
    
Hmm, Vec isn't as easy to use as I thought. How would I declare that Foo n contains a vector of n length? Something like (Vec n Integer v) => Foo n = Foo v? –  So8res Feb 13 '12 at 18:51
    
Well with type-unary vectors for example you could write : data Foo where Foo :: Vec n Integer -> Foo n. You have convenient type synonyms for small value so Foo N1, Foo N4 and so on... –  Jedai Feb 13 '12 at 21:41
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Nope. Not possible.

The closest alternative to what you want looks something like this:

data FooZero = Zero
data FooSucc a = Succ Int a

type Foo0 = FooZero
type Foo1 = FooSucc Foo0
type Foo2 = FooSucc Foo1
...
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You can do something like

{-# LANGUAGE OverlappingInstances #-}

data Foo a = Foo Int a

single :: Int -> Foo ()
single n = Foo n ()  

append :: Int -> Foo a -> Foo (Foo a)
append n foo = Foo n foo

size foo = subtract 1 $ fold (const (+1)) 0 foo
asList foo = reverse $ fold (flip (:)) [] foo

class FooOp a where
  fold :: (b -> Int -> b) -> b -> a -> b
  fooMap :: (Int -> Int) -> a -> a
  fromList :: [Int] -> a

instance FooOp (Foo ()) where  
  fold op m (Foo n ()) = m `op` n
  fooMap op (Foo n ()) = single (op n)
  fromList [x] = single x 

instance FooOp n => FooOp (Foo n) where
  fold op m (Foo n foo) = fold op (m `op` n) foo
  fooMap op (Foo n foo) = Foo (op n) $ fooMap op foo  
  fromList (x:xs) = Foo x $ fromList xs

Note that fromList is an unsafe operation (but there is no way around, as the list type holds no length information).

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