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I need an help to solve an exercise.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

struct p_prodotto {
    char *costo;
    char *quantita;
};

typedef struct p_prodotto id_prezzo;

struct partecipante {
    id_prezzo *prezzo;
    unsigned short codice;
};

struct partecipante persona[1] = {{{"We", "Ciao"},100}};

int main()
{
    printf ("%s", persona[0].prezzo.costo); // This doesn't works
    return 0;
}

I have the struct p_prodotto with two char pointers inside. There is the typedef, then there is another struct "partecipante" that calls to the type of the struct above.

Is this a case of struct of struct? If so, I need to create an array. I did it like this:

struct partecipante persona[1] = {{{"We", "Ciao"},100}};

Am I doing it wrong? If it is correct, how can I access the "costo" and "quantita" fields?

Thanks in advance for the help.

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
struct partecipante persona[1] = {{{"We", "Ciao"},100}};

That initialises the struct's first member as a struct p_prodotto, but it is declared as a pointer to that. Either change struct partecipante to

struct partecipante {
    id_prezzo prezzo;
    unsigned short codice;
};

or initialise it in a different way.

For example

id_prezzo prz = {"We", "Ciao"};
struct partecipante persona[1] = {{&prz,100}};

int main()
{
    printf ("%s", persona[0].prezzo->costo);
    return 0;
}

if you can't change the definition of struct p_prodotto.

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Unfortunately I can't change anything up to the end of the second struct. It is the text of the exercise that has been assigned to me. –  wiredmark Feb 13 '12 at 16:53
1  
Then you can initialise persona in two steps, perhaps? (see edit) –  Daniel Fischer Feb 13 '12 at 16:59
    
Thanks, this did the trick. Now if I want to increment the array (for example persona[10]) i should make an array of prz (prz[10]). There are not other ways to do everything instead in one step? Like 'struct partecipante persona[1] = {{&{10,10},100}};' (i know is not possible, but just something similar)? –  wiredmark Feb 13 '12 at 17:11
    
I don't know of any way to do that, sorry. –  Daniel Fischer Feb 13 '12 at 18:14
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I see some problems in your code:

1- Your code won't even compile on gcc.

2- You're initializing your struct the wrong way and you're working with POINTERS to structs and not real structs (you're leaving stubs which need to be initialized by something like malloc instead of real structs)

3- Why a [1] array? let's just take that off and work with downright basics, one simple entry for starters :-)

Let's take a look at the main struct:

struct partecipante {
    id_prezzo *prezzo;
    unsigned short codice;
};

id_prezo *prezzo points to a structure but has no space itself to hold data....as i see you're still learning the basics, let's take that * off and make it hold real data (at the expense of being more dynamic, which you don't want anyway now since you're learning).

struct partecipante {
    id_prezzo prezzo; // the partecipante struct now holds enough space to fit a id_prezzo inside it
    unsigned short codice;
};

Fixing your main struct allocation

struct partecipante persona; // This holds space for ONE persona

Initializing the persona variable inside a code block (in this case, inside main()) and also fixing the printf statement

int main()
{

    persona.prezzo.costo = "blabla this is costo";
    persona.prezzo.quantita = "blabla this is quantita";
    persona.codice = 123;

    printf ("Costo is --> %s\n", persona.prezzo.costo); // This know WORKS!
    return 0;
}

I won't post the finished source so you get to play with the fixups yourself and evolve. Good luck!

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Thanks a lot for your help! However, I can't change the content of the struct to id_prezzo prezzo without the wildcard, because it was given with it in the exercise for university. –  wiredmark Feb 13 '12 at 17:16
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do you get segfault? I think you should allocate space for costo and quantita, they are just pointers

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Nope. I don't know what is it and hasn't been explained yet at our University, so it should not be used –  wiredmark Feb 13 '12 at 16:52
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The problem is this:

id_prezzo *prezzo;

You define 'prezzo' as a pointer type, but create it as a struct, not a pointer to a struct:

{"We", "Ciao"}

You have two options, the simplest of which is to simply change this:

id_prezzo *prezzo;

To this:

id_prezzo prezzo;

Or, you can use malloc() / free() to create a pointer to a struct for you:

id_prezzo *myPrezzo = malloc(sizeof(id_prezzo));
myPrezzo->costo = "We";
myPrezzo->quantita = "Ciao";
persona[0].prezzo = myPrezzo;

// after you are done with persona:
free(myPrezzo);

Alternatively, you could use alloca() or get the address a local struct variable, it really depends on the lifetime of the struct.

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