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I have web-service (wcf) to analyze files. Size of files are 1-10 mb. File may  be processed by a few seconds, maybe more, only CPU using. I am not sure, but I think It will be at least 100 requests per seconds. 

public Result ProcessFile(byte[] file)
{
}

What is the best way to implement service? Synchronous or Asynchronous operations? Queries? Load balancing? Anything else?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would either use a message queue or a WCF server using netTcpBinding and callbacks.

Message queues makes it very easy to validate the files. No load balancer etc are needed. The service that receives them can place them on a network share and then send a validate message in the queue. Any of the servers that are listening on the queue can process a request.

The netTcpBinding is more solid for callbacks which I would use it instead of a HTTP binding.

File may be processed by a few seconds, maybe more, only CPU using. I am not sure, but I think It will be at least 100 requests per seconds.

Have you though that through? The server will burn if any of the files takes longer that one second if you have at least 100 requests per second.

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Ofcause, I need several servers. Why do you recommend mq or callbacks? What is reason to implement it? –  Andy Feb 14 '12 at 16:48
    
@Andy: read my update. –  jgauffin Feb 14 '12 at 18:54
    
Thank you. I have read about queues, but I don't understand why it better than only web servers and load balancer. In this case I need to copy file on network share and then on application server. I think it's unnecessary work. Am I wrong? I plan to use load balancer with several servers that hosts wcf-service. What do you think about my architecture? –  Andy Feb 15 '12 at 18:25

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