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I have a do-while loop that needs to log a message once (so it doesn't clutter the log) each time its status (e.g. pass/fail) changes, but still has to do other things each time it goes through the loop. Using a simple boolean variable can basically tell you if you've already logged that message, which works once you're in a known condition. However, if you want the message to be printed the first time in either case (pass/fail), you have to account for that. For example, if you default your condition to true, and it is, in fact, true the first time, it won't log the 'True' message b/c it thinks it was already true (and vice-versa for i.c. false).

This seems like it would be a good place for a nullable boolean with i.c.=Null, but in languages where those aren't present, what's one to do?

The simplest solution I could think of would be to use an extra boolean variable like 'firstTime = True', but using that always bothers me as an elementary workaround when I feel like there should be a more delicate way to handle it. Another option is to use the breakout condition of the do-while as your initial condition for whatever variable you're using as your conditional, but that can be confusing when someone reads int status = STATUS_QUIT, and it certainly requires more explanatory comments than bool firstTime = true. A third option would be to use an enum instead of a bool and have {firstTime, true, false} or something.

Are there other reasons for using one over the other, or are there better ways of doing this?

Code example with two options I came up with:

Using bool firsttime:

bool firstTime = true, infoFound = false;
do
{
    if (getInfo())
    {
        if (!infoFound)
        {
            // log it (ONCE)(important)
            infoFound = true;
        }
        // use info (every time)
    }
    else if (infoFound || firstTime)
    {
        // log it (ONCE)(important)
        infoFound = false;
        firstTime = false;
    }
// FYI, WaitForStatusUpdate is a blocking call...
} while (STATUS_QUIT != WaitForStatusUpdate());

Use the while loop 'break-out condition' as the initial condition for a check variable:
(status is updated at the end of the do-while, so the do section will not be executed ever again if status == breakOutCondition; we can use this to our advantage here and set status = breakOutContition initially - the first time through it will be breakOutCondition but any subsequent loop will be something else... Still not sure I like this as it's kind of a hack...

bool infoFound = false;
int status = STATUS_QUIT;
do
{
    if (getInfo())
    {
        if (!infoFound)
        {
            // log it (ONCE)(important)
            infoFound = true;
        }
        // use info (every time)
    }
    else if (infoFound || firstTime)
    {
        // log it (ONCE)(important)
        infoFound = false;
    }
    status = WaitForStatusUpdate();
} while (STATUS_QUIT != status);

(I'm tagging this as c++ since that's what I'm using, but this really could apply to any language with similar constructs)

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1  
If you are using C++, you should be using bool and true/false rather than BOOL and TRUE/FALSE. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 13 '12 at 17:17
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: yeah, we're using windef.h which has #define FALSE 0, but I'll switch to false here so others can compile and such without adding that... good catch :) –  johnny Feb 13 '12 at 17:22
    
strangely enough (or perhaps not?), it seems windef also defines BOOL as int, so I could have just used an integer (or enum) with equivalent results... but again, want to stay away from windows-specific for this question –  johnny Feb 13 '12 at 18:18
    
that is usually for compatibility with C, where there is no bool type. There won't be much of a difference, but bool is standard while BOOL isn't :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 13 '12 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Wouldn't an enum be clearer?

enum State { Unknown, Pass, Fail };
State state = Unknown;
...
State newState = getInfo() ? Pass : Fail;
if (newState != state) { log();  state = newState; }
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1  
This was one of my original thoughts ('third option' referenced in the OP); perhaps it's the cleanest after all but I guess I considered it possible overkill? In any case, I was interested to see what others thought as well... –  johnny Feb 13 '12 at 18:23
    
I guess one reason I'm not terribly partial to using an enum is that I can't think of a good way to check state without using conditionals like if ((infoFound == state) || (newState == state)) (with State state) as opposed to simply if (infoFound) (with bool state) - certainly not a great reason, but this may boil down to matters of preference anyways... –  johnny Feb 13 '12 at 18:36
    
Well, to me this is a clearer expression of the algorithm; I get confused by your two flags. But that may indeed just be a matter of taste. –  Alan Stokes Feb 13 '12 at 18:45

C++ almost has nullable booleans, boost::optional<bool> would do the trick I believe.

One common way to do this in C++ is a stream wrapper that you create in the proper context, and it remembers for example how many times it's flushed and prevents further logging from happening. You just do your logging as normal and let the stream decide whether to send it on to the wrapped stream.

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Thanks for the stream wrapper idea - I'll have to look into that more - might certainly be more work than it's worth for this application, but could be a good implementation in general... –  johnny Feb 13 '12 at 17:31
    
if using boost, boost::logic::tribool might be more convenient. –  Sander De Dycker Feb 13 '12 at 17:35

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