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ubuntu 10.04 LTS(2.6.32-38-generic) i686 - intel i7 - 16GB

I got a map failed error to memset certain amount of memory. Do you have any idea? Additional information is I could malloc the same size. Here's my code.

    //Here I could malloc successfully
    pdev->frame_buffer = (uint16_t *)malloc(3840000);
    //Then, I got map_failed error here and message from compiler is "Invalid argument"
    if((pdev->frame_buffer = (uint16_t *)mmap(0, 3840000, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fb, 0)) == MAP_FAILED){
        perror("Error: cannot mmap frame buffer");
        exit(1);
    }

If I mmap smaller than the size I tried above like mmap(0, 100,...), then it returns right address. I'm not sure if this issue is because of the size.

Do you have any guess why it happend?

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2 Answers 2

Your memset actually has an off-by-one error. You've malloc'd 3,840,000 bytes, but your meset range specifies a total of 3,840,001 bytes to set. The args should be

if((pdev->frame_buffer = (uint16_t *)mmap(0, 3839999, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, fb, 0)) == MAP_FAILED){
                                             ^^^^^^^---note the change.
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Your code example does not contain memset at all, only malloc and mmap?

My guess as to why mmap fails is that the file descriptor refers to the framebuffer (the context suggests so, both from the variable name frame_buffer and the file descriptor fb), and you have a combination of "allocated larger than framebuffer", "allocated with a permission/flag combination that the driver does not like" and "some other obscure reason".

Mapping the framebuffer or any other device memory is not as trivial as mapping normal memory or a file (well, it kind of is, but then again, not), there can be many more obvious and less obvious reasons why this might fail.

The first obvious thing to look for would be if your current screen resolution times bytes-per-pixel adds up to 3840000 at all. If it doesn't, you're out of bounds.

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