Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Assume we have below lists:

    List<int> Journey1 = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    List<int> Journey2 = new List<int>() { 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 3, 4 };
    List<int> Journey3 = new List<int>() { 6, 7, 1 };
    List<int> Journey4 = new List<int>() { 3, 1, 4 };

And the patterns are:

2, 3, 4 -> Journey1, Journey2;
6, 7    -> Journey2, Journey3;
1       -> Journey2, Journey3, Journey4;
5       -> Journey1;
3, 4    -> Journey2;
3       -> Journey4;
4       -> Journey4;

We have 5000 lists, and each has around 200 items, so the patterns can have between 1-200 items and can be seen in 1-5000 lists.

Therefore I need very fast way of pattern matching.

share|improve this question
4  
Can you explain the rules? Eg. Why is it not 3 -> Journey1, Journey2, Journey4 –  Blorgbeard Feb 13 '12 at 17:41
1  
Oh, the patterns are (sequence) => (list of lists to search) ? –  Blorgbeard Feb 13 '12 at 17:43
    
we need to find patterns from longest to shortest therefore first I selected 2,3,4 which is longest patter seen in more than one journey. –  Behnam Feb 20 '12 at 10:01

4 Answers 4

Without precomputation and with a naive on-the-fly search:

var matchedJourneys = journeys.Where(x => ContainsPattern(x, mypattern));

bool ContainsPattern(List<int> list, List<int> pattern)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < list.Count - (pattern.Count - 1); i++)
    {
        var match = true;
        for(int j = 0; j < pattern.Count; j++)  
            if(list[i + j] != pattern[j])
                     {
                         match = false;
                         break;
                     }
        if(match) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

This will execute at max 200 million equals checks for your 'numbers'. But since checks are not expected to be executed for whole patterns, that could be (just a guess) ~5 million equals operations if checking all the lists. That's a few hundred milliseconds.

It all depends on what is 'very fast' for you. If that's too slow, you will need a much much more complicated approach ...

share|improve this answer
1  
This is n^2 and it doesn't create patterns to find. Just matches patterns to the lists. Which is only half the job. –  jb. Feb 13 '12 at 18:26
    
It's unclear if the patterns are known or are yet to be found. I assumed they are known, since the question gives us 'single' item patterns like '1' and '5' (and discovery of such patterns with machine learning doesn't make sense). –  doblak Feb 13 '12 at 18:31
    
Many thanks Darjan, but as jb said it doesn't create pattern, it should start to create patterns, to create patterns we have simple role each pattern should seen at least in one Journey. at the end of process if some nodes remain on lists which are not in any pattern, we will add them as new patterns. –  Behnam Feb 14 '12 at 10:55

I am not sure what you want as output. I just made a Try.

I suggest that you make a list of lists, instead of declaring individual list variables.

List<List<int>> journeys = new List<List<int>>();
journeys.Add(new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 });
journeys.Add(new List<int>() { 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 3, 4 });
journeys.Add(new List<int>() { 6, 7, 1 });
journeys.Add(new List<int>() { 3, 1, 4 });

I assumed that the numbers range from 0 to 255. With this query

var result = Enumerable.Range(0, 256)
    .Select(number => new
    {
        number,
        listIndexes = journeys
            .Select((list, index) => new { index, list })
            .Where(a => a.list.Contains(number))
            .Select(a => a.index)
            .ToList()
    })
    .Where(b => b.listIndexes.Count > 0)
    .ToList();

and this test loop

foreach (var item in result) {
    Console.Write("Number {0} occurs in list # ", item.number);
    foreach (var index in item.listIndexes) {
        Console.Write("{0} ", index);
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

you will get this result

    Number 1 occurs in list # 0 2 3 
    Number 2 occurs in list # 0 1 
    Number 3 occurs in list # 0 1 3 
    Number 4 occurs in list # 0 1 3 
    Number 5 occurs in list # 0 
    Number 6 occurs in list # 1 2 
    Number 7 occurs in list # 1 2 

Where the lists are numbered starting at zero.

share|improve this answer

For brute force approach you can try to use polynomial hash-functions to speed up sub-section matches. Still insane number of comparisons required, but at least match could be almost constant irrespective of sub-sequence length.

share|improve this answer

In your case there are opportunities to benefit from pattern preprocessing as well as text preprocessing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_searching_algorithm).

For instance, constructing a trie for all subsequences in a list will allow to query this list for a given pattern in time proportional to the pattern length.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.