Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a non JSNI way to add a close button to the title bar area of a DialogBox?

share|improve this question

14 Answers 14

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

A more simplier solution is to use gwt-ext (http://code.google.com/p/gwt-ext/). It is free and easy to use and integrate. You can see their showcase http://www.gwt-ext.com/demo/. I think that what you want is the MessageBox or Layout Window (they are on the Windows category of the showcase).

Regards.

share|improve this answer
1  
They actually go the length of creating their own box, which is certainly handy. Unfortunately, this does not lend to being able to do it with GWT code and I can't use this library in my product at this time. My site is almost done and integrating a library this size in now wouldn't be the best idea for me to do. –  Organiccat Jun 4 '09 at 14:43
    
But you can integrate the library and use it onle for that specific situation, the rest will be done using the standard GWT widgets. But yes, if you used GWT-ext from the beginning, you can take a lot of advantage of its cool and useful widgets. Using a library of this size to only put a cross to close a window, maybe its not the best solution. Why don't you look at their code to the widget that you want? Maybe you can use it separately... –  David Campos Jun 4 '09 at 15:10

We used GWT-ext from the begining in our project. It was a bad idea. They have lots of cool widgets, but they are not GWT widgets AND they have no compatibility with GWT widgets. Once you choose GWT-Ext, everything, even the event mechanism, must be in the GWT-Ext way, not in the GWT way. This library will not be updated for the newest version of GWT, because the javascript library Ext is no more free. We are removing GWT-Ext from our project now.

It´s not possible to add a different widget int the GWT DialogBox caption, but you can extend "DecoratedPanel" (it is the DialogBox parent). Look at the DialogBox source to learn the techniques, specially how it adds the Caption object to the panel and how the window drag is implemented.

That´s what we have done here, and it works very well. We´ve made our own Caption class that extends FocusablePanel (a SimplePanel that captures all mouse events) and we added a HorizontalPanel to it, with buttons and text. We had to override onAttach() and onDetach() just by calling the super method (they are protected).

I believe I am not allowed to put our source code in here, so I just can give you these tips.

share|improve this answer

I created this caption class:

public class DialogBoxCaptionWithCancel extends Composite 
    implements Caption, HasClickHandlers {

@UiField
HTMLPanel mainPanel;
@UiField
HTML captionLabel;
@UiField
PushButton cancelButton;

private HandlerManager handlerManager = null;

private static final Binder binder = GWT.create(Binder.class);

interface Binder extends UiBinder<Widget, DialogBoxCaptionWithCancel> {
}

public DialogBoxCaptionWithCancel() {
    initWidget(binder.createAndBindUi(this));

    mainPanel.setStyleName("Caption");
    Image upImage = new Image("images/closeWindow.png");
    Image hoverImage = new Image("images/closeWindowFocus.png");
    cancelButton.getUpFace().setImage(upImage);
    cancelButton.getUpHoveringFace().setImage(hoverImage);
    cancelButton.setStylePrimaryName("none");
}

/*
 * (non-Javadoc)
 * 
 * @see com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.Widget#onLoad()
 */
@Override
protected void onLoad() {
    super.onLoad();

    handlerManager = new HandlerManager(this);
}

@UiHandler("cancelButton")
public void cancelButtonOnClick(ClickEvent event) {
    handlerManager.fireEvent(event);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseDownHandler(MouseDownHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseDownEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseUpHandler(MouseUpHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseUpEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseOutHandler(MouseOutHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseOutEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseOverHandler(MouseOverHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseOverEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseMoveHandler(MouseMoveHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseMoveEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseWheelHandler(MouseWheelHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(MouseWheelEvent.getType(), handler);
}

@Override
public String getHTML() {
    return "";
}

@Override
public void setHTML(String html) {
}

@Override
public String getText() {
    return this.captionLabel.getText();
}

@Override
public void setText(String text) {
    this.captionLabel.setText(text);
}

@Override
public void setHTML(SafeHtml html) {
}

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addClickHandler(ClickHandler handler) {
    return handlerManager.addHandler(ClickEvent.getType(), handler);
}

}

The images are just captured from the behavior of IE8 when you mouse over the cancel button.

Here is the UiBinder code:

<!DOCTYPE ui:UiBinder SYSTEM "http://dl.google.com/gwt/DTD/xhtml.ent">
<ui:UiBinder 
xmlns:ui='urn:ui:com.google.gwt.uibinder' 
xmlns:g='urn:import:com.google.gwt.user.client.ui'>

<ui:style>
    .htmlField {
        width: 100%;
    }

    .pushButton {
        border: none;
        padding: 0px;
        width: 49px;
        height: 21px;
    }
</ui:style>

<g:HTMLPanel ui:field="mainPanel">
    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%">
        <tr>
            <td width="100%">
                <g:HTML ui:field="captionLabel" addStyleNames="{style.htmlField}"></g:HTML>
            </td>
            <td>
                <g:PushButton ui:field="cancelButton" addStyleNames="{style.pushButton}"></g:PushButton>
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</g:HTMLPanel>
</ui:UiBinder>

Then my class that extends DialogBox has the following:

public class MyDialogBox extends DialogBox implements ClickHandler {
...
// instantiate the caption with the cancel button
private static DialogBoxCaptionWithCancel caption = new DialogBoxCaptionWithCancel();
...
 public MyDialogBox() {
    // construct the dialog box with the custom caption
    super(false, false, caption);

    setWidget(binder.createAndBindUi(this));

    // set the caption's text
    caption.setText("My Caption");
}
....
protected void onLoad() {
    super.onLoad();

    // let us react to the captions cancel button
    caption.addClickHandler(this);
}
...
@Override
public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    // the caption's cancel button was clicked
    this.hide();
}
share|improve this answer

You can do it by adding a button to the center panel of the DialogBox:

Image closeButton = new Image("");
closeButton.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
   public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
      registerBox.hide();               
   }
});

closeButton.setStyleName("TopRight");

Then position it with CSS:

.TopRight {
   float:right;
   margin-top:-22px;
   width:16px;
   height:16px;
   display:block;
   background-image: url(images/cancel_16.png);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hum, you should add it as the first element of the panel or you will have to change the css. –  BimboJones Mar 15 '10 at 16:01
    
I think this is the easiest solution. Works great! –  Charmin Nov 11 '13 at 16:11

You can try this out, slightly improved solution by fungus1487:

import com.google.gwt.dom.client.EventTarget;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.ClickEvent;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.ClickHandler;
import com.google.gwt.i18n.client.HasDirection;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.Element;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.*;

/**
 * @author Andrey Talnikov
 */
public class ClosablePopup extends DialogBox {

    private Anchor closeAnchor;

    /**
     * Instantiates new closable popup.
     *
     * @param title        the title
     * @param defaultClose it {@code true}, hide popup on 'x' click
     */
    public ClosablePopup(String title, boolean defaultClose) {
        super(true);

        closeAnchor = new Anchor("x");

        FlexTable captionLayoutTable = new FlexTable();
        captionLayoutTable.setWidth("100%");
        captionLayoutTable.setText(0, 0, title);
        captionLayoutTable.setWidget(0, 1, closeAnchor);
        captionLayoutTable.getCellFormatter().setHorizontalAlignment(0, 1,
                HasHorizontalAlignment.HorizontalAlignmentConstant.endOf(HasDirection.Direction.LTR));

        HTML caption = (HTML) getCaption();
        caption.getElement().appendChild(captionLayoutTable.getElement());

        caption.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
                EventTarget target = event.getNativeEvent().getEventTarget();
                Element targetElement = (Element) target.cast();

                if (targetElement == closeAnchor.getElement()) {
                    closeAnchor.fireEvent(event);
                }
            }
        });

        if (defaultClose) {
            addCloseHandler(new ClickHandler() {
                @Override
                public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
                    hide();
                }
            });
        }
    }

    public void addCloseHandler(ClickHandler handler) {
        closeAnchor.addClickHandler(handler);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Yes there is

No there isn't - at least not without fiddling with GWT's DialogBox class itself or by recreating the DialogBox using common widgets. This is a known issue in GWT, aka issue 1405 (Star it to show your interest).

However; DialogBox doesn't give us the tools to do this so we need to extend it - Edit: this doesn't work.

If you want to make a drop-in replacement for DialogBox you can name your class DialogBox and import it instead of the one that's included in GWT. This thread on the GWT forum gives better details on how this can be done (outdated, uses listeners) Outdated, the internals of DialogBox have been changed a lot since this thread - it doesn't work.

Here's some code I hacked to get the same results (used the linked thread for guidance). This doesn't work:

MyDialogBox:

import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.ClickEvent;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.ClickHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOutEvent;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOutHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOverEvent;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOverHandler;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.DOM;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.Element;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.Window;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.DialogBox;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HTML;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HorizontalPanel;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.Label;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.Widget;

public class MyDialogBox extends DialogBox {

    private class crossHandler implements ClickHandler, MouseOverHandler, MouseOutHandler
    {

    	@Override
    	public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    		hide();
    		Window.alert("Click!");
    	}

    	@Override
    	public void onMouseOver(MouseOverEvent event) {
    		DOM.setStyleAttribute(cross.getElement(), "font-weight", "bold");

    	}

    	@Override
    	public void onMouseOut(MouseOutEvent event) {
    		DOM.setStyleAttribute(cross.getElement(), "font-weight", "normal");

    	}


    }

    Label cross = new Label("X"); // The close button
    crossHandler crosshandler = new crossHandler();
    HTML caption = new HTML(); // The caption aka title
    HorizontalPanel captionPanel = new HorizontalPanel(); // Contains caption and cross


      /**
       * Creates an empty dialog box. It should not be shown until its child widget
       * has been added using {@link #add(Widget)}.
       */
    public MyDialogBox()
    {
    	this(false);
    }

  /**
   * Creates an empty dialog box specifying its "auto-hide" property. It should
   * not be shown until its child widget has been added using
   * {@link #add(Widget)}.
   * 
   * @param autoHide <code>true</code> if the dialog should be automatically
   *          hidden when the user clicks outside of it
   */
    public MyDialogBox(boolean autoHide) {
    	    this(autoHide, true);
    	  }

    /**
     * Creates an empty dialog box specifying its "auto-hide" property. It should
     * not be shown until its child widget has been added using
     * {@link #add(Widget)}.
     * 
     * @param autoHide <code>true</code> if the dialog should be automatically
     *          hidden when the user clicks outside of it
     * @param modal <code>true</code> if keyboard and mouse events for widgets not
     *          contained by the dialog should be ignored
     */
    public MyDialogBox(boolean autoHide, boolean modal)
    {
    	super(autoHide, modal);

    	cross.addClickHandler(crosshandler); 
    	cross.addMouseOutHandler(crosshandler);
    	cross.addMouseOverHandler(crosshandler);

    	captionPanel.add(caption);
    	captionPanel.add(cross);
    	captionPanel.setStyleName("caption");

    	Element td = getCellElement(0, 1);  // Get the cell element that holds the caption
    	td.setInnerHTML(""); // Remove the old caption
    	td.appendChild(captionPanel.getElement());



    }

    @Override
    public void setText(String text)
    {
    	caption.setText(text);
    }

    public String getText()
    {
    	return caption.getText();
    } 

    public void setHtml(String html)
    {
    	caption.setHTML(html);
    }

    public String getHtml()
    {
    	return caption.getHTML();
    }

Note: This code doesn't work. The ClickEvent isn't sent from cross but instead from MyDialogBox regardless of whether you add ClickHandlers to the cross or not, IOW the MyDialogBox is the sender/source and therefor not possible to check against cross. When cross is clicked it doesn't fire the ClickEvent for some reasons.

Edit: It appears this cannot be done without hacks unless you either write your own DialogBox (almost) from scratch or fix issue 1405. Of course there are number of existing libraries that have already solved this problem, i.e. SmartGWT and GWT-Ext, but their implementation is made mostly from scratch.

So to answer your question in one sentence: Yes there is a way, but you're not gonna like it :)

share|improve this answer
    
That's the general comment I've seen around the web, although a few people say it's possible, so I'm still holding out hope. –  Organiccat Jun 4 '09 at 14:44
    
If you find out why only DialogBox fires ClickEvents (not cross) you could use my method. –  Hannson Jun 4 '09 at 15:48

I guess a simple answer to this is to instantiate a widget to replace the standard Caption widget from DialogBox. I created a caption that has a button at right and you can pick a reference to it. Then you can add any click event you desire.

In GWT 2.4 I used the following solution:

import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseDownHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseMoveHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOutHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOverHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseUpHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseWheelHandler;
import com.google.gwt.event.shared.HandlerRegistration;
import com.google.gwt.safehtml.shared.SafeHtml;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HorizontalPanel;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.InlineLabel;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.PushButton;
import com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.DialogBox.Caption;

/**
 * @author Cristiano Sumariva
 */
public class ButtonCaption extends HorizontalPanel implements Caption
{
  protected InlineLabel text;
  protected PushButton closeDialog;

  /**
   * @return the button at caption
   */
  public PushButton getCloseButton()
  {
    return closeDialog;
  }
  public ButtonCaption( String label )
  {
    super();
    setWidth( "100%" );
    setStyleName( "Caption" ); // so you have same styling as standard caption widget
    closeDialog = new PushButton();
    add( text = new InlineLabel( label ) );
    add( closeDialog );
    setCellWidth( closeDialog, "1px" ); // to make button cell minimal enough to it
  }
  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseDownHandlers#addMouseDownHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseDownHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseDownHandler( MouseDownHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseDownHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseUpHandlers#addMouseUpHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseUpHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseUpHandler( MouseUpHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseUpHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseOutHandlers#addMouseOutHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOutHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseOutHandler( MouseOutHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseOutHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseOverHandlers#addMouseOverHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseOverHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseOverHandler( MouseOverHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseOverHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseMoveHandlers#addMouseMoveHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseMoveHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseMoveHandler( MouseMoveHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseMoveHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.HasMouseWheelHandlers#addMouseWheelHandler(com.google.gwt.event.dom.client.MouseWheelHandler)
   */
  @Override
  public HandlerRegistration addMouseWheelHandler( MouseWheelHandler handler )
  {
    return addMouseWheelHandler( handler );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HasHTML#getHTML()
   */
  @Override
  public String getHTML()
  {
    return getElement().getInnerHTML();
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HasHTML#setHTML(java.lang.String)
   */
  @Override
  public void setHTML( String html )
  {
    remove( text );
    insert( text, 1 );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HasText#getText()
   */
  @Override
  public String getText()
  {
    return text.getText();
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.user.client.ui.HasText#setText(java.lang.String)
   */
  @Override
  public void setText( String text )
  {
    this.text.setText( text );
  }

  /* (non-Javadoc)
   * @see com.google.gwt.safehtml.client.HasSafeHtml#setHTML(com.google.gwt.safehtml.shared.SafeHtml)
   */
  @Override
  public void setHTML( SafeHtml html )
  {
    setHTML( html.asString() );
  }
}

Extends the DialogBox to use the new ButtonCaption available

class CaptionCloseableDialogBox extends DialogBox
{
  public CaptionCloseableDialogBox()
  {
    super( new ButtonCaption( "dialog box title" ) );
    setAutoHideEnabled( false );

    ButtonCaption ref = (ButtonCaption) this.getCaption();
    PushButton closeButton = ref.getCloseButton();
    // apply button face here closeButton;
    closeButton.addClickHandler( /* attach any click handler here like close this dialog */ );
  }
}

Hope it helps any.

share|improve this answer

Check out the active project: http://code.google.com/p/gwt-mosaic/

Their noble goal is, as mentioned on their page:

The goal is to provide a complete widget set by keeping the API as close as possible to the GWT's standard widgets API.

Have been trapped in the GXT vortex. Not at all a fan of how they require users to use entirely different API for listeners, etc. On their part this makes sense. After all, GXT is just a port of their existing javascript libraries. But I've been looking for this MOSAIC project for too long...

share|improve this answer

Just using GWT and no external libraries you can intercept the click events on the caption element and perform a hit test to see if the x,y mouse coord is within the bounds of the anchor element (or other element your using as a ClickHandler).

// Create anchor we want to accept click events
final Anchor myAnchor = new Anchor("My Anchor");

// Add handler to anchor
myAnchor.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
  @Override
  public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    Window.alert("Anchor was clicked");
  }
});

// Create dialog
final DialogBox myDialog = new DialogBox();
myDialog.setText("My Dialog");

// Get caption element
final HTML caption = ((HTML)myDialog.getCaption());

// Add anchor to caption
caption.getElement().appendChild(myAnchor.getElement());

// Add click handler to caption
caption.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler() {
  @Override
  public void onClick(ClickEvent event) {
    // Get x,y caption click relative to the anchor
    final int x = event.getRelativeX(myAnchor.getElement());
    final int y = event.getRelativeY(myAnchor.getElement());

    // Check click was within bounds of anchor
    if(x >= 0 && y >= 0 && 
      x <= myAnchor.getOffsetWidth() && 
      y <= myAnchor.getOffsetHeight()) {
        // Raise event on anchor
        myAnchor.fireEvent(event);
    }
  }
});

// Show the dialog
myDialog.show();
share|improve this answer

I realize this is ridiculously old, but you can just use absolute positioning with top and right of 0 to get a widget in the upper right. The dialog box is itself absolutely positioned, so the positioning of your widget will be against it.

share|improve this answer

This works if you just wan't a simple solution for the question asked:

    Image button = new Image("images/cancel.png"); 

    button.addClickHandler(new ClickHandler(){ 
        public void onClick(ClickEvent event) { 
            hide();
        }
    }); 
    button.setStyleName("dialog-close");

    HorizontalPanel header = new HorizontalPanel();
    header.add(new HTML("Example Tool"));
    header.add(button);

    setHTML(header.getElement().getInnerHTML());
share|improve this answer

You can find the closeable dialogbox in google code under the project synthfuljava. It is actually called scrollable dialog box with a close X button at the caption.

The following blog explains the impediments that had to be overcome in order for thecaption X button to be able to listen to the click event to let it work:

http://h2g2java.blessedgeek.com/2009/07/gwt-useable-closeable-scrollable.html

share|improve this answer

I think the ButtonCaption of cavila is the best solution, but there is a bug in the implementation of the caption. The call of one of the overidden methods causes a infinitive loop because the method calls itself recursively.

To prevent this you you can call the method on the InlineLabel text instead:

@Override
public HandlerRegistration addMouseDownHandler( MouseDownHandler handler ) {
    return text.addMouseDownHandler( handler );
}
share|improve this answer

The GWT dialog box's top level DIV has absolute positioning, so you can do the same with your close button. This allows you to put it in the body of the dialog as far as the DOM is concerned, but make it physically appear in the caption.

In my example below, I place it in the exact upper right of the dialog, and center it on the caption using padding.

<ui:style>
    .close {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
        padding: 3px 3px 1px 3px !important;
        border-radius: 4px;
        margin: 5px;
    }
</ui:style>

<g:PushButton ui:field="closeButton" addStyleNames="{style.close}">
    <g:upFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
    <g:downFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
    <g:upHoveringFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
    <g:downHoveringFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
    <g:upDisabledFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
    <g:downDisabledFace image='{closeIcon}'/>
</g:PushButton>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.