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Is there anything in the C standard (I guess at the moment that's C99 + TC1-3 C11) that guarantees that & and | will not be short-circuited?

If I write:

x = y & foo();

...I expect foo will always get called, but is that really defined? In theory, barring the standard saying otherwise, if y contained 0, a runtime optimization could skip the call in the absense of something saying that's not allowed. (And similarly with |, you could ignore the right-hand operand if the left-hand operand were already all-bits-on. For that matter, even x = y * foo(); could be short-circuited if y were 0.)

Not knowing the specification well (and I don't), it's tricky to prove a negative like that. I can contrast the sections on & (6.5.10 in C99) and && (6.5.13 in C99). In the latter, it's perfectly clear:

Unlike the bitwise binary & operator, the && operator guarantees left-to-right evaluation; there is a sequence point after the evaluation of the first operand. If the first operand compares equal to 0, the second operand is not evaluated.

...but 6.5.10 doesn't specifically state the negative version of that.

It seems reasonable to me to take the fact that 6.5.10 doesn't define a sequence point to mean that foo will always get called and an implementation that didn't call it would be non-standard. Am I right about that?

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FYI, the current standard is C11, that site hasn't been updated yet: iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/… –  Shea Levy Feb 13 '12 at 18:07
    
@SheaLevy: Thanks, I'd missed that "C11" became real at last! –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 18:08
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+1 I'd never considered that bitwise ops could short-circuit. –  Ben Zotto Feb 13 '12 at 18:14
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&& and || are special cases. & and | are no different to e.g. + and -. So if you can find language that describes what happens for generic binary operators, it should apply to & and | as well. –  Oliver Charlesworth Feb 13 '12 at 18:25
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It is unfair to leave multiplication by zero out of the discussion: once you see that a or b is zero, you can stop evaluating a*b. No compiler I know does it, though. Moreover, since there is no sequence point, allowing the program to short-circuit the rest of multiplication would make your program non-deterministic. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 13 '12 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It seems reasonable to me to take the fact that 6.5.10 doesn't define a sequence point to mean that foo will always get called and an implementation that didn't call it would be non-standard. Am I right about that?

Yes and no. Indeed, the implementation that wouldn't call foo would be nonstandard. However, it doesn't have anything to do with sequence points.

The paragraph that would apply here would be 5.1.2.3/3:

In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object).

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Ah, now, that helps a lot. Thank you. I'm not 100% sure I don't see some wiggle room in there (in that: do the "semantics" really say all operands are evaluated barring saying otherwise?), but that section is nevertheless quite reassuring. I think any reasonable read of it does indeed say that all operands are evaluated. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 18:38
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I think it means that the compiler must call it, unless it's 100% certain you have no way of knowing if it didn't. –  ugoren Feb 13 '12 at 21:22
    
@ugoren; That's how I read it. Either it must call it, or it must only call it when I can tell the difference between it calling it and not calling it, in which case it's a "tree falling in the forest" thing and I'm not worried about that. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 22:33

In this case, sequence points have nothing to do with it. The C standard defines the way the logical machine behaves, and requires that an implementation behave as if it followed that behavior; any optimizations must be transparent with regards to the behavior of the program.

The only operators in the C language which are defined not to evaluate (all of) their operands are ?:, &&, ||, and sizeof. The only way an implementation could short-circuit | or & is if it determined (1) that the value of a single operand is sufficient to know the result, or at least to know if the result is zero or nonzero when the result is only being used as a truth value, and (2) that the other operand has no side effects, and thus the behavior of not evaluating it is the same as if it was evaluated.

With a function call, it's unlikely that the compiler could determine it has no side effects unless it's either static or flagged with a compiler-specific attribute like gcc's __attribute__((const)).

Edit: From C99, 5.1.2.3:

In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object).

The operators which do not evaluate their operands are then explicitly documented as such.

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Thanks, but where is it written in the standard that all operators evaluate all of their operands unless the operator is explicitly defined otherwise? That's the crux of my question. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 18:31
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The reason is the same reason that f(); calls f even if you don't assign the result anywhere. I'll dig up some references for you... –  R.. Feb 13 '12 at 18:39
    
@R..: Thanks. A very good point about f();. I think it's Section 5.1.2p3 primarily, jpalecek and later ouah both pointed it out. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 18:41

If the implementation can determine that the foo function call does not change the observable bevahior of the program, the foo call does not need to be evaluated.

(C11, 5.1.2.3p4) "In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object)."

The notion of observable behavior is added and clarified in C11:

(C11, 5.1.2.3p6) "The least requirements on a conforming implementation are: — Accesses to volatile objects are evaluated strictly according to the rules of the abstract machine. — At program termination, all data written into files shall be identical to the result that execution of the program according to the abstract semantics would have produced. — The input and output dynamics of interactive devices shall take place as specified in 7.21.3. The intent of these requirements is that unbuffered or line-buffered output appear as soon as possible, to ensure that prompting messages actually appear prior to a program waiting for input. This is the observable behavior of the program."

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§6.5.10 Bitwise AND operator

...

Semantics

3 The usual arithmetic conversions are performed on the operands.

There you have it. Applying the usual arithmetic conversions requires that both operands are evaluated. Note that this paragraph is not present in the description of the semantics of &&, ||, or ?:.

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Thanks. I went down that road before posting my question (the "usual arithmetic conversions" are defined in 6.3.1.8), but couldn't convince myself that that, alone, was sufficient. I'm still not sure it is. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 13 '12 at 18:47

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