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I have code that needs to run on both Excel 2003 and Excel 2007, and there are a few spots where changes in the versions cause the code to halt. I tried separating these lines out with If-Else statements, but the code won't compile on either because it doesn't recognize the code used for the other. Is there any way I could tell one version to ignore a block of code, similar to a C or C++-style #ifdef, in VBA?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a good starting point, but it won't work with the version of Excel that its running on, since that can only be figured out at run-time, not compile time.

If you need to branch your code based on information only discoverable at run time you might consider late binding as a solution. There are two ways you can sneak around version problems.

The first way can be used if you need to Access a property or method that only exists in certain versions, you can use CallByName. The advantage of call by name is that it allows you to preserve early binding (and intellisense) for your objects as much as possible.

To give an example, Excel 2007 has a new TintAndShade property. If you wanted to change the color of a range, and for Excel 2007 also ensure TintAndShade was set to 0 you would run into trouble because your code won't compile in Excel 2003 which does not have TintAndShade as a property of the range object. If you access the property that you know is not in all versions using CallByName, you code will compile in all versions fine, but only run in the versions you specify. See below:

Sub Test() 
    ColorRange Selection, Excel.Application.version, 6 
End Sub 
Sub ColorRange(rng As Excel.Range, version As Double, ParamArray args() As Variant) 
    With rng.Interior 
        .colorIndex = 6 
        .Pattern = xlSolid 
        If version >= 12# Then 
             'Because the property name is stored in a string this will still compile.
             'And it will only get called if the correct version is in use.
            CallByName rng.Interior, "TintAndShade", VbLet, 0 
        End If 
    End With 
End Sub

The second way is for classes that have to be instantiated via "New" and don't even exist in old versions. You won't run into this problem with Excel, but I will give a quickie demo so you can see what I mean:

Imagine that you wanted to do File IO, and for some bizarre reason not all of the computers had the Microsoft Scripting Runtime on them. But for some equally bizarre reason you wanted to make sure it was used whenever it was available. If set a reference to it and use early binding in your code, the code won't compile on systems that don't have the file. So you use late binding instead:

Public Sub test()
    Dim strMyString As String
    Dim strMyPath As String
    strMyPath = "C:\Test\Junk.txt"
    strMyString = "Foo"
    If LenB(Dir("C:\Windows\System32\scrrun.dll")) Then
        WriteString strMyPath, strMyString
    Else
        WriteStringNative strMyPath, strMyString
    End If
End Sub

Public Sub WriteString(ByVal path As String, ByVal value As String)
    Dim fso As Object '<-Use generic object
    'This is late binding:
    Set fso = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    fso.CreateTextFile(path, True, False).Write value
End Sub

Public Sub WriteStringNative(ByVal path As String, ByVal value As String)
    Dim lngFileNum As Long
    lngFileNum = FreeFile
    If LenB(Dir(path)) Then Kill path
    Open path For Binary Access Write Lock Read Write As #lngFileNum
    Put #lngFileNum, , value
    Close #lngFileNum
End Sub

There is a comprehensive list of all Adds and Changes to Excel Object Model since 2003:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb149069.aspx For changes between 1997 and 2000 go here:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa140068(office.10).aspx

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Can you post the offending lines of code?

If it is a constant like vbYes or xlFileFormat or whatever, use the corresponding numeric value.

Show me what you got, I'll see if I can refactor it.

Bill

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This isn't needed -- the code was macro-generated, and the code from 2003 works fine in 2007, so I've just scrapped the 2007 code. – Andrew Scagnelli Jun 4 '09 at 14:00

Yes it is possible to do conditional compilation in Excel VBA. Below is a brief resource and some example code: Conditional Compilation

#If Win32 Then
    ' Profile String functions:
    Private Declare Function WritePrivateProfileString Lib "KERNEL32" Alias "WritePrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpString As Any, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Long
    Private Declare Function GetPrivateProfileString Lib "KERNEL32" Alias "GetPrivateProfileStringA" (ByVal lpApplicationName As Any, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpDefault As Any, ByVal lpReturnedString As String, ByVal nSize As Long, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Long
#Else
    ' Profile String functions:
    Private Declare Function WritePrivateProfileString Lib "Kernel" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpString As Any, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Integer
    Private Declare Function GetPrivateProfileString Lib "Kernel" (ByVal lpApplicationName As String, ByVal lpKeyName As Any, ByVal lpDefault As Any, ByVal lpReturnedString As String, ByVal nSize As Integer, ByVal lpFileName As String) As Integer
#End If
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This is a good starting point, but it won't work with the version of Excel that its running on, since that can only be figured out at run-time, not compile time. – Andrew Scagnelli May 29 '09 at 17:42
    
doesn't answer the question, while that will work for general compilation directives the question states how to check the applicatino version of Excel. – Anonymous Type Sep 27 '10 at 22:34

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