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Working on a REST API for work, and came across an issue where I want to pass a value that represents a relationship but also a URL of that relationship so that it could be compliant with HATEOAS.

I think I've come up with an appropriate solution, but would like some confirmation from those with more knowledge then me.

Would this RESTful JSON response still be compliant with HATEOAS principles?

{
  "employee":{
      "empId":12345,
      "fName":"Bubba",
      "lName":"Gump",
      "title":"Shrimp",
      "reportsTo":54321,
      "hateoas":{
          "self":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/12345",
          "reportsTo":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/54321",
          "directReports":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/?reportsTo=12345"
      }
  }
}

So what do you all think? Will that format work?

Based on the suggestion from @fumanchu below, this is the format I'll try using for now...

{
    "employee":{
        "empId":12345,
        "fName":"Bubba",
        "lName":"Gump",
        "title":"Shrimp",
        "reportsTo":54321,
        "hateoas":{
            "collection":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/",
            "self":"12345",
            "reportsTo":"54321",
            "directReports":"12345/DirectReports"
        }
    }
}

Thanks for the guidance!

share|improve this question
    
Looks good, Bubba. –  Jonathan M Feb 13 '12 at 18:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It "works" but it's redundant. Once you have the URI's why keep the bare id's that communicate nothing about their semantics or how they are to be used? I'd recommend you try this instead:

{
    "employee":{
        "self":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/12345",
        "fName":"Bubba",
        "lName":"Gump",
        "title":"Shrimp",
        "reportsTo":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/54321",
        "directReports":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/12345/directReports"
    }
}

(There's no reason to expose the "directReports" resource as "?reportsTo=12345". It's always better to identify it by its meaning than by its implementation.)

If you are in control of your API and/or media type (and you must be in order to tell your clients where to expect URI's since JSON doesn't define any), you can even shorten that by declaring that the "reportsTo", and "directReports" values are URI's which are relative to "self":

{
    "employee":{
        "self":"http://www.bubbagumpshrimp.com/rest/Employees/12345",
        "fName":"Bubba",
        "lName":"Gump",
        "title":"Shrimp",
        "reportsTo":"54321",
        "directReports":"12345/directReports"
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah it is redundant :/ . The reason I chose the format I did was due to how my server technology handles translation of resources to XML or JSON responses. (I'm using Java's JAX-RS annotations on JAXB POJOs). The way I have it now allows for Java's default response writers and readers to handle all HTTP verbs with a single POJO, which reduces the overall lines of code and complexity. Ease of programming is really crucial as I'm trying to develop a template for other programmers unfamiliar with Java or REST to follow. (Not ideal I know, but such is the corporate environment). –  hypno7oad Feb 14 '12 at 5:01

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