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I'm starting to define my Entity classes for a game I am writing. However, I want a lot of code re-use. I want to define classes for different functionality, and then have classes which 'have' some of these classes' functionality.

For example:

class Collidable:
    def handle_collision(other, incident_vector):
        pass

    def __init__(self, shape):
        self.shape = shape

class Movable:
    def update_position(self):
        self.velocity += self.acceleration
        self.position += self.velocity

    def __init__(self, velocity, acceleration):
        self.velocity, self.acceleration = velocity, acceleration

class Drawable:
    def draw(self):
        pass

    def __init__(self, image):
        self.image = image

class Controllable:
    def key_down(self, key):
        pass

    def __init__(self):
        pass

Then have a Player class which is Collidable, Movable, Drawable, Controllable, an Invisible Barrier which is only Collidable, a Background which is only Drawable, etc. I've heard of many different ways of connecting multiple classes, (such as via Composition, (Multiple) Inheritance, Interfaces, etc), but I don't know which is most appropriate and/or pythonic for this situation.

Mix-ins (special case of Multiple Inheritance) looks to be what I'm looking for (since a Player should BE a Collidable, a Movable, a Drawable, and a Controllable), but in trying this out, I'm finding difficulty in using super to pass the right arguments to the right init functions.

Edit:

I'm using python 3.2.

share|improve this question
2  
Remember to always inherit your classes, however short, from "object" so that "modern" object behavior works on them. There are quite a lot of usefull feartures that only work on new style classes, which in Python 2 are classes that derive from "object". As an alternative, if you have a single file with lots of short classes inherting from nothing, just set a module level __metaclass__=type variable - that will have the same effect than inheriting each class from object –  jsbueno Feb 13 '12 at 18:59
    
Is this still valid for Python 3.x? I didn't mention that I was using Python 3.2 for my development, as I wasn't aware of any issues with super other than the change in syntax (from a direct to an indirect reference to the parent). –  Darthfett Feb 13 '12 at 19:31
    
@Darthfett: In Py3k, classes inherit from object by default. –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 20:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a simple way to implement the inheritance using super(). For this to work you will always need to create instances of Player (and other classes that inherit from your ***able classes) with keyword arguments. Each base class will strip whatever keyword arguments it is using from kwargs and pass the rest on to the next __init__() in the mro, for example:

class Collidable(object):
    def handle_collision(other, incident_vector):
        pass

    def __init__(self, shape, **kwargs):
        self.shape = shape
        super(Collidable, self).__init__(**kwargs)

class Movable(object):
    def update_position(self):
        self.velocity += self.acceleration
        self.position += self.velocity

    def __init__(self, velocity, acceleration, **kwargs):
        self.velocity, self.acceleration = velocity, acceleration
        super(Movable, self).__init__(**kwargs)

class Drawable(object):
    def draw(self):
        pass

    def __init__(self, image, **kwargs):
        self.image = image
        super(Drawable, self).__init__(**kwargs)

class Controllable(object):
    def key_down(self, key):
        pass

    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(Controllable, self).__init__(**kwargs)

Then you could define your Player class:

class Player(Collidable, Movable, Drawable, Controllable):
    pass

And use it like this:

>>> p = Player(shape='circle', velocity=0.0, acceleration=1.0, image='player.png')
>>> p.shape
'circle'
>>> p.velocity
0.0
>>> p.acceleration
1.0

If you need additional instance variables for the Player class you would define an __init__() similar to the other classes, for example:

class Player(Collidable, Movable, Drawable, Controllable):
    def __init__(name, **kwargs):
        self.name = name
        super(Player, self).__init__(**kwargs)
share|improve this answer
1  
I agree that this is the most natural way of of doing it in Python - the way the OOP system is intendend to be used. –  jsbueno Feb 13 '12 at 18:52
2  
This will get hacky as soon as the Player instance has to pass it's own arguments to the parent constructors. Then we'll need to kwargs.update({...}). It will get even uglier if several parameters have the same name... –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 19:50
    
@NiklasB. It's simple to just use self.* members after calling the super constructor, unless you REALLY need to act on them before passing them up. You're right about the parameter names though. This is the single one thing I don't like about it. It could be a useful way of stealing a module's optional parameter, but it provides an easy way to make a mistake. –  Darthfett Feb 14 '12 at 14:25

Mixins are the way to go, but you don't want to call __init__ on them:

class CollidableMixin(object):
    #...
    def init_collidable(self, shape):
        self.shape = shape

class MovableMixin(object):
    #...
    def init_movable(self, velocity, acceleration):
        self.velocity, self.acceleration = velocity, acceleration

class DrawableMixin(object):
    #...
    def init_drawable(self, image):
        self.image = image

As I see it, you don't need a separate class for Controllable because it just defines an interface which the inheriting class should have. While you do that a lot in statically typed languages like Java, you don't need that in Python. Instead, you just define a key_down method and be done with it. This is called duck typing.

In an example implementation, this will then look like this:

class Player(CollidableMixin, DrawableMixin, MovableMixin):
    def __init__(self):
        self.init_collidable(...)
        self.init_drawable(...)
        self.init_movable(...)

    def key_down(self, key):
        # ...

objects = []
objects.append(Player())
# ... add some more objects. Later we iterate through that collection,
# not knowing which of them is a player:
for o in objects:
    try:
        o.key_down(...)
    except AttributeError:
        pass
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, I like very much. Solves some issues with my game too :) I wonder, though, how standard such an approach is. Is it accepted as a good practice to define 'private versions of init'? It seems to me that the code could still use standard init methods. Instead of self.init_collidable(...), you get Collidable.__init__(...). Isn't clearer and using more standard approach? Cheers –  Morlock Feb 13 '12 at 18:39
    
Why wouldn't I want to call init on them? Is this to answer the question of giving the right arguments to the right classes? Could I resolve this by using a **kwargs argument? –  Darthfett Feb 13 '12 at 18:40
    
@Darthfett: with new-style classes super(...).__init__(...) only works if all methods have the same signature. You can't specify in which order the methods are called. You can of course use an approach like in the other answer, but you will lose some safety by doing it (and it's usually not worth it!). –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 19:29
    
@Morlock: I think this is the way it had to be done with old-style classes, but it's discouraged for new-style classes (although I can't tell you why, sorry). –  Niklas B. Feb 13 '12 at 19:32

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