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I am interested in this more from the server administrator perspective than from the developers.

As a real world example, say I have a line in ps aux that shows:

usercom  1696  0.1  0.2  34104  4556 ?        Ss   07:33   0:20 ./mail

It isn't inherently obvious that this is a perl script, but I can determine it is by doing "lsof -p 1696", which renders (in addition to other things):

COMMAND  PID     USER   FD   TYPE     DEVICE    SIZE       NODE NAME

perl    1693 usercom  txt    REG       0,49   17326   99846241 /home/virtfs/usercom/usr/local/bin/perl

So this tells me that this is a script running in the perl interpreter for this user (in openvz).

If I look at the cwd for this script, it results in a directory that does not contain a "mail" executable file.

The Question What are some techniques for determining the "origin" of perl code that is currently executing (from the server administrator's perspective). I've come to accept that there is really no way of absolutely determining the "source" of the running perl script, as $0 is very easily manipulated. Additionally, it is possible to pipe code into perl or eval it. Nontheless though, does anyone know any good ways of tracking down the root of a perl script?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Look for the 'cwd' (current working directory) line in the output of 'lsof'.

localhost proc # ps ax | grep test
 4751 pts/18   S+     0:00 sh test.sh

localhost proc # lsof +p 4751
COMMAND  PID  USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF     NODE NAME
sh      4751 user  cwd    DIR    8,3    12288  4964356 /home/user
<CLIP>
localhost proc #    

Just to verify I moved the script and tried it again.

user@localhost ~ $ mv test.sh bin/
user@localhost ~ $ cd bin
user@localhost ~/bin $ sh test.sh

localhost proc # ps ax | grep test
 4848 pts/18   S+     0:00 sh test.sh

localhost proc # lsof +p 4848
COMMAND  PID  USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF     NODE NAME
sh      4848 user  cwd    DIR    8,3     4096  4965757 /home/user/bin
<CLIP>
localhost proc # 

If you don't want to rely on 'lsof' you can look in the '/proc/$pid/' directory and see where 'cwd' symlinks to:

localhost 4848 # ls -l
total 0
<CLIP>
lrwxrwxrwx 1 user user 0 Feb 13 18:51 cwd -> /home/user/bin
<CLIP>
localhost 4848 # 

Hope that helps...

Edit: Tested this with a Perl script that changes '$0'

user@localhost ~/bin $ ./test.pl 

localhost 4848 # ps ax | grep test
 5004 pts/17   S+     0:00 grep --colour=auto test

localhost 4848 # ps ax | grep bogus
 5002 pts/18   S+     0:00 bogus.pl
 5006 pts/17   R+     0:00 grep --colour=auto bogus

localhost 5002 # lsof +p 5002
COMMAND  PID  USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE/OFF     NODE NAME
test.pl 5002 user  cwd    DIR    8,3     4096  4965757 /home/user/bin
<CLIP>
localhost 5002 # 


localhost ~ # cd /proc/5002/
localhost 5002 # ls -l
total 0
<CLIP>
lrwxrwxrwx 1 user user 0 Feb 13 19:12 cwd -> /home/user/bin
<CLIP>

The file '/proc/$pid/status' contains the original script name:

localhost 5002 # cat status
Name:   test.pl
<CLIP>
localhost 5002 # 
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate that, but what do you do when the user changes $0 from "sh test.sh" to "bogusfile.sh"? –  GoldenNewby Feb 13 '12 at 19:05
    
You can still look at the pid of 'bogus.sh' and the same information is available (tested and verified with a perl script). If there are multiple scripts in the 'cwd' of that $pid you can grep the scripts for 'bogus' or grep to see which scripts change '$0' (for Perl). My apologies if I am missing something. –  Woody2143 Feb 13 '12 at 19:17
    
I did some more looking; in '/proc/$pid/' the files 'sched', 'stat' and 'status' contain the original name of the script. I tested this against a script that changed '$0'. –  Woody2143 Feb 13 '12 at 19:22
    
Interesting, I'll be turning on this person's account in a couple of hours and I'll let you know if it helps narrow it down. Thanks! –  GoldenNewby Feb 13 '12 at 19:27
    
I don't see any way to PM here, so... Any luck? –  Woody2143 Feb 14 '12 at 15:32

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