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I am trying to use the output of a grep command to make replacements in all files found. The problem is that some of the files found have spaces in their names. Here is a grep command simplified from the one I'm using (which finds multiple names at multiple mail hosts).

grep -Ril oldname@foo.com *

This produces a list that has the files I need, just listing the file names (the -l option). Using backticks I'm feeding the file names into a Perl one-liner:

perl -pi -e 's/oldname\@foo\.com/newname\@bar.com/gi' `grep -Ril oldname@foo.com *`

This works when none of the files listed happen to have spaces in their names but when one does, it breaks.

With find I know I could use -print0 and xargs -0, but there doesn't seem to be anything equivalent for grep.

I could put the output from grep into a file and then read that but now I want to know if this is somehow possible as a one-liner.

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1 Answer 1

My grep has a -Z --null option to output NUL after every file name, you could use that with perl -0.

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Somehow I didn't see that. I could have sworn I read the entire man page for grep. That technically solves my problem but I'm still doing something wrong. Adding Z as a switch to grep removes the new lines between files. But when I add -0 to my perl command, it's not recognizing the file separator correctly. It now complains that it cannot find (for instance) file1.txtfile2.txtfile3.txt which are the first three files in the directory. –  user1207446 Feb 13 '12 at 20:20
    
Following up on my own comment, the answer it to use -Z with grep (as noted by jbowes) and then send that to perl using xargs -0 instead of perl -0. So: grep -ZRilIE "foo" * | xargs -0 perl -pi -e 's/foo/bar/gi' –  user1207446 Feb 15 '12 at 16:46

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