Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'd like to set up a Java application that works as a server, accepting (blocking) queries from a Bash script. The Java part is written using nio, and has a main loop that looks like this:

ServerSocketChannel ssc = ...; // bound to localhost:8011
Charset charset = ...;

// Waits for connections forever.
while(true) {
  SocketChannel sc = ssc.accept();
  StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
  int read = 0;
  // Builds up a string representing the query.
  while(true) {
    ByteBuffer bb = ByteBuffer.allocate(1024);
    read = sc.read(bb);
    if(read == -1) break;
    bb.flip();
    CharBuffer cb = charset.decode(bb);
    sb.append(cb.toString());
  }
  // Do something with the query.
  sc.write(charset.encode(CharBuffer.wrap(sb.toString())));
  sc.close();
}

The Bash part relies on the /dev/tcp/ magic:

exec 3<> /dev/tcp/localhost/8011
echo "message" 1>&3

I can see that the message sent from Bash does reach the Java part (if I add a System.out.println(cb); in the inner loop, I can see the parts), but the inner loop doesn't terminate unless I kill the Bash script.

My question is really quite simple: how can the Bash script signal to the Java server that its communication has come to an end? I've tried adding

echo -en "\004" 1>&3 

in my Bash script, but that didn't help.

share|improve this question
    
On second thought, I might be misunderstanding how channels work. What I'm trying to achieve is to get Java to think that the communication has ended for now but may resume later. Somehow I'm thinking this should be an action distinct from simply closing the channel, but that could be wrong. Maybe what I really need is a tiny protocol that says "this is how the end of a message looks like". An answer that clarifies this for me would be acceptable too. – Philippe Feb 13 '12 at 18:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try closing the file descriptor. This should be seen by Java as a closed stream, and allow the inner loop to terminate.

exec 3>&-

It is possible for a socket can be "half-open" (that is, shut down in one direction but still open in the other). A Socket instance has methods to detect this state.

I haven't tested whether the pipe-socket hybrid created by bash supports this or not. If it doesn't, you'll have to design a protocol with some internal length-encoding or delimiting sequences to indicate message boundaries.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the syntax. The problem is that Java then cannot write to the channel (ie. the server cannot "Do something with the query"). – Philippe Feb 13 '12 at 19:19
    
@Philippe Did you try it? I haven't tested it, but it is possible for a socket can be "half-open" (that is, shut down in one direction but still open in the other). If that doesn't work, then you really need to ask a different question (about protocol design), because the protocol you posted appears to depend on shutting down input, but keeping output open. – erickson Feb 13 '12 at 19:26
    
Yes I tried it; the Java side throws an IOException "Broken pipe". I'm also starting to think my question is wrong, because I originally misunderstood what a return code of -1 means for read (see my own comment under the question). – Philippe Feb 13 '12 at 19:47
    
Perhaps you could edit your answer to include the comments on closing the stream, and half-closed streams? Then I can accept it. – Philippe Feb 13 '12 at 21:50
    
@Philippe Done. – erickson Feb 14 '12 at 20:34

What I'm trying to achieve is to get Java to think that the communication has ended for now but may resume later.

You need to understand that this requirement is a contradiction in terms. Either the communication has ended or it may resume later. There is nothing in TCP that supports this, ergo nothing in Java either.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.