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In most of the methods I use that return some kind of collection I return IEnumerable rather than the specific type (e.g. List). In many cases I have another collection that I want to combine with the result IEnumerable, this would be exactly like taking a List and adding another List to it using the AddRange method. I have the following example, in it I have created an extension method that should take a collection of items to add and adds them to a base collection, while debugging this appears to works but in the original collection the items are never added. I don't understand this, why aren't they added, is there something about the implementation of the IEnumerable that I am missing? I understand that IEnumerable is a read only interface, but Iam not adding to this list in the example below, I am replacing it, but the original IEnumerable does not change.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var collectionOne = new CollectionContainerOne();
        var collectionTwo = new CollectionContainerTwo();

        // Starts at 1- 50 //
        collectionOne.Orders.AddRange(collectionTwo.Orders);
        // Should now be 100 items but remains original 50 //
    }
}

public class CollectionContainerOne
{
    public IEnumerable<Order> Orders { get; set; }

    public CollectionContainerOne()
    {
        var testIds = Enumerable.Range(1, 50);
        var orders = new List<Order>();
        foreach (int i in testIds)
        {
            orders.Add(new Order() { Id = i, Name = "Order #" + i.ToString() });
        }
        this.Orders = orders;
    }
}

public class CollectionContainerTwo
{
    public IEnumerable<Order> Orders { get; set; }

    public CollectionContainerTwo()
    {
        var testIds = Enumerable.Range(51, 50);
        var orders = new List<Order>();
        foreach (int i in testIds)
        {
            orders.Add(new Order() { Id = i, Name = "Order #" + i.ToString() });
        }
        this.Orders = orders;
    }
}

public class Order
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Name;
    }
}

public static class IEnumerable
{
    public static void AddRange<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerationToAddTo, IEnumerable<T> itemsToAdd)
    {
        var addingToList = enumerationToAddTo.ToList();
        addingToList.AddRange(itemsToAdd);

        // Neither of the following works // 
        enumerationToAddTo.Concat(addingToList);
        // OR
        enumerationToAddTo = addingToList;
        // OR
        enumerationToAddTo = new List<T>(addingToList);
    }
}
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are modifying the parameter enumerationToAddTo, which is a reference. However, the reference is not itself passed by reference, so when you modify the reference, the change is not observable in the caller. Furthermore, it is not possible to use ref parameters in extension methods.

You are better off using Enumerable.Concat<T>. Alternatively, you can use ICollection, which has an Add(T) method. Unfortunately, List<T>.AddRange isn't defined in any interface.

Here is an example to illustrate the passing of reference types by reference. As Nikola points out, this is not really useful code. Don't try this at home!

void Caller()
{
    // think of ss as a piece of paper that tells you where to find the list.
    List<string> ss = new List<string> { "a", "b" };

    //passing by value: we take another piece of paper and copy the information on ss to that piece of paper; we pass that to the method
    DoNotReassign(ss);

    //as this point, ss refers to the same list, that now contains { "a", "b", "c" }

    //passing by reference: we pass the actual original piece of paper to the method.
    Reassign(ref ss);

    // now, ss refers to a different list, whose contents are { "x", "y", "z" }
}
void DoNotReassign(List<string> strings)
{
    strings.Add("c");
    strings = new List<string> { "x", "y", "z" }; // the caller will not see the change of reference

    //in the piece of paper analogy, we have erased the piece of paper and written the location
    //of the new list on it.  Because this piece of paper is a copy of SS, the caller doesn't see the change.
}
void Reassign(ref List<string> strings)
{
    strings.Add("d");
    //at this point, strings contains { "a", "b", "c", "d" }, but we're about to throw that away:

    strings = new List<string> { "x", "y", "z" };

    //because strings is a reference to the caller's variable ss, the caller sees the reassignment to a new collection
    //in the piece of paper analogy, when we erase the paper and put the new object's
    //location on it, the caller sees that, because we are operating on the same
    //piece of paper ("ss") as the caller 
}

EDIT

Consider this program fragment:

string originalValue = "Hello, World!";
string workingCopy = originalValue;
workingCopy = workingCopy.Substring(0, workingCopy.Length - 1);
workingCopy = workingCopy + "?";
Console.WriteLine(originalValue.Equals("Hello, World!"); // writes "True"
Console.WriteLine(originalValue.Equals(workingCopy); // writes "False"

If your assumption about reference types were true, the output would be "False" then "True"

share|improve this answer
    
One should not grab hold of using ref parameters to fix problem with modifying collections. By doing this he may be breaking other parts of code which expect same reference to the collection. Solution would be to hold such reference that it can be modified rather than passing a reference and casting a collection and one place, and sending collection references as values in other place. This just just prolonging and further complicating programmers suffering :) –  Nikola Radosavljević Feb 13 '12 at 19:46
    
@Nikola that is an excellent point. The sample code was intended only to illustrate the concept of passing a reference-type argument by reference. It might have been better to use a reference type other than List<T>. I will edit the post to make it clear that the sample code is not a useful approach to any problem. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 19:54
    
@Nikola having said that, in the context of the incorrect assumption that modifying a reference-type variable modifies all variables that share the same referent, the problem you are referring to would magically disappear. The point of this answer was to differentiate between reference-type objects and their references; once that has been done the unsuitability of the approach should be clear. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 20:03
    
@JohnMaloney variables of all reference types hold references to objects, not the objects themselves. If you change one reference to a given object, you are not changing other references to the same object. See the piece of paper analogy in the comments added to the sample code. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 20:48
    
@JohnMaloney I added another example to illustrate. –  phoog Feb 13 '12 at 20:59

Calling your extensions method like this:

collectionOne.Orders.AddRange(collectionTwo.Orders);

Is essentially the same as:

IEnumerable.AddRange(collectionOne.Orders, collectionTwo.Orders);

Now what happens there, is you pass copy of reference to the collectionOne.Orders to the AddRange method. In your AddRange implementation you try to assign new value to the copy. It gets "lost" inside. You are not assigning new value to collectionOne.Orders, you assign it to its local copy - which scope is only within the method body itself. As a result of all modifications happenining inside AddRange, outside world notices no changes.

You either need to return new enumerable, or work on lists directly. Having mutating methods on IEnumerable<T> is rather counterintuitive, I'd stay away from doing that.

share|improve this answer

IEnumerable does not support adding. What you in essence did in your code is create new collection from your enumerable, and add items to that new collection. Your old collection still has same items.

E.g., you create a collection of numbers like this

Collection1 = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ]

when you do Collection1.ToList().Add(...) you will get new collection with same members, and add new members like so:

Collection1 = [ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, ... ]

your old collection will however still hold old members, as ToList creates new collection.

Solution #1:

Instead of using IEnumerable use IList which supports modification.

Solution #2 (bad):

Cast your IEnumerable back to it's derived type and add members to it. This is quite bad though, in fact it's better to just return List in the first place

IEnumerable<Order> collectionOne = ...;
List<Order> collectionOneList = (List<Order>)collectionOne;
collectionOneList.Add(new Order());

General guideline (best):

If you are returning collections which are standard in .NET there is no reason to return their interfaces. In this case it's best to use original type. If you are however returning collection which you implemented yourself, then you should return an interface It's a completely different case when you are thinking about input parameters. If your method is asking to enumerate over items, then you should ask for IEnumerable. This way you can do what you need over it, and you are placing least constraint on person who is calling it. They can send any enumerable. If you need to add to that collection, you may require IList so that you can also modify it in your method.

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Basically the problem is that you can't assign a value to enumerationToAddTo partially because it isn't a reference parameter. Also as phoog mentions ToList() creates a new list and does not cast the existing IEnumerable to a list.

This isn't really a good use of a extension. I would recommend that you add a method to your container collection that allows you add add new items to the IEnumerable instance. This would better encapsulate the logic that's particular to that class.

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What you want exists and is called Concat. Essentially, when you do this in your Main:

var combined = collectionOne.Orders.Concat(collectionTwo.Orders);

Here, combined will refer to an IEnumerable that will traverse both source collections when enumerated.

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly what he would want because at some point he would miss again unfortunately. He has to drop IEnumerable idea and go for IList –  Nikola Radosavljević Feb 13 '12 at 19:16
1  
collectionOne.Orders = collectionOne.Orders.Concat(collectionTwo.Orders); –  Chris Shouts Feb 13 '12 at 19:20

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