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Seems like if you're looking to be able to call methods on a Module(/Class), you're looking for a singleton... And if that's the case, you're better of using class methods or the Singleton mixin (not looking for answers on which one of those is "better").

The only benefit (?) I can see in using #module_function is the flexibility to mix in the module as well as call methods on the module. Is there anything else?

I ran across some old code that used to work < 1.9.3, but doesn't anymore and am looking to fix. It looked something like this:

module MyThing
  def self.do_something
    ...
  end
end

...and allowed for:

MyThing.do_something

I'm not trying to argue that this design was a good one--just trying to figure out what the best way is to fix it. Leaning towards a standard Module...

Update...

I'd incorrectly simplified my problem and example. The differing behavior that I'm experiencing is during my RSpec tests--they pass using RSpec 2.8.0 with MRI 1.9.2, but fail with MRI 1.9.3. The module looks like:

module MyThing
  module SubThing
    module SubSubThing
      def self.do_something
        ...
      end
    end
  end
end

...and tests:

describe MyThing::SubThing::SubSubThing do
  include MyThing::SubThing

  describe "#do_something" do
    it "does something" do
      SubSubThing.do_something
    end
  end
end

When running the specs under 1.9.3, I get NameError: uninitialized constant DataGathering; under 1.9.2, they pass. That led me to incorrectly diagnose the problem and present what I did above. Seems as if include behavior is different in 1.9.3. That's fine; my question still stands: does #module_function provide something special?

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2  
Your example works here - running Ruby 1.9.3dev (2011-09-23 revision 33323) [x86_64-darwin11.0.0]. –  louism Feb 13 '12 at 19:10
    
Thanks for checking; that made me realize I'd incorrectly diagnosed the problem. I've updated to describe the real issue. –  turboladen Feb 13 '12 at 21:48
    
FWIW, looks like my 1.9.2 v. 1.9.3 problem was logged as a 1.9.3 bug (originally logged by Matz), but turned out to be a 1.9.2 bug. Go figure. –  turboladen Feb 14 '12 at 0:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The purpose of module_function is exactly that which you mentioned in your question: it gives you the flexibility to explicitly call class methods on a module, using the module name, or to mix it in and make things a bit more concise.

You can also do the same thing with extend self (inside the module definition). The difference is that if you mix in a module which uses module_function, the mixed-in methods will become private instance methods (but they will be public class methods of the declaring module); if you use extend self, they will have whatever access qualifier was used in the module definition, both when mixed-in and when called directly on the module as class methods.

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I just did some quick tests in irb, and corrected my answer. –  Alex D Feb 13 '12 at 22:31
    
Looking back at this post, I might add that I consider the Singleton mixin (since the OP mentioned it) almost useless. If you want a "singleton", just create a new object (using Object.new), and define whatever methods you need on it. –  Alex D Jan 19 '13 at 19:01

Module in Ruby is abstractly equivalent to Namespace in C++. This should be fine for Ruby 1.9.3:

module MyThing
   def MyThing.do_something
      # ...
   end
end

do_something could also be implemented as an instance method of MyThing, which is where things get murky.

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You're right; I incorrectly described my problem. Updated accordingly. –  turboladen Feb 13 '12 at 21:47

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