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When I get a full command line string from the registry, or elsewhere, for example:

mycommand -p -o c:\file\1.txt -r output

or

"c:\program files\dir\executable.exe" -options -o1 -o2

How could I split easily between the executable file and the arguments?

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Windows command line parsing is rather wonky, since it's done by the C runtime library (you can examine the code in your Visual Studio install directory at something like

  • C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC\crt\src\stdargv.c

The actual path on your machine may vary, of course. And, it won't be their if you didn't install the C runtime sources with Visual Studio.

I believe the "logic" such as it is was inherited from DOS, so it's rather crufty.

The basic grammar goes something like this:

  • A Command Line is a sequence of 1 or more WORDS separated by Whitespace.

  • Each Word is a sequence of 1 or more of the following: BARE_WORD, QUOTED_WORD or ESCAPE_SEQUENCE. Words are terminated by whitespace or the end of the command line.

  • A BARE_WORD is a sequence of 1 or more characters other than backslash ('\'), double-quote ('"') or whitespace.

  • A QUOTED_WORD is introduced by a LEAD_IN_QUOTE ('"'), followed by zero or more of the following:

    • Whitespace
    • ESCAPE_SEQUENCE
    • BAREWORD

    and is terminated by a LEAD_OUT_QUOTE ('"'). The lead-in and lead-out quotes are removed from the quoted word.

  • An ESCAPE_SEQUENCE is one of the following constructs:

    • An even number of backslashes ('"'), followed by a quotation mark ('"').
      This represents a series of escaped backslashes followed by a lead-in/lead-out quote. Each pair of backslashes represents a single backslash.
    • An odd number of backslashes, followed by a quotation mark ('"').
      This represents a series of escaped backslashes, followed by a literal quotation mark.
    • A sequence of backslashes, that is not followed by a quotation mark.
      This represents a series of unescaped backslashes and is passed through as-is.

That's about it.

The first word on the command line is the command name (e.g., the name/path of the executable). Strictly speaking parsing the command name should be simpler than the other words as it must be represent a valid NTFS file name. That's not necessarily true, however, depending on who composed the command line.

Here's some sample C# code that should parse any given command line in the same way that the Windows OS does, though I should note that this has not been throughly tested.

The method Parse() returns an IEnumerable<string>, the first element of which is the command/program name, with the remainder the words that make up the arguments.

class CommandLineParser
{
    char[]        cmd; // source buffer
    StringBuilder buf; // output buffer
    int           i; // current position within the source buffer

    public CommandLineParser()
    {
        cmd = null;
        buf = null;
        i = -1;
        return;
    }

    public IEnumerable<string> Parse( string commandLine )
    {
        cmd = commandLine.ToCharArray();
        buf = new StringBuilder();
        i = 0;

        while ( i < cmd.Length )
        {
            char ch = cmd[i];

            if ( char.IsWhiteSpace( ch ) ) { throw new InvalidOperationException(); }
            else if ( ch == '\\' ) { ParseEscapeSequence(); }
            else if ( ch == '"' ) { ParseQuotedWord(); }
            else { ParseBareWord(); }

            if ( i >= cmd.Length || char.IsWhiteSpace( cmd[i] ) )
            {
                string arg = buf.ToString();

                yield return arg;

                buf.Length = 0;
                ConsumeWhitespace();                    
            }                
        }            
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Parse a quoted word
    /// </summary>
    private void ParseQuotedWord()
    {

        // scan over the lead-in quotation mark w/o adding it to the buffer
        ++i;

        // scan the contents of the quoted word into the buffer
        while ( i < cmd.Length && cmd[i] != '"' )
        {
            char ch = cmd[i];
            if ( ch == '\\' ) { ParseEscapeSequence(); }
            else { buf.Append( ch ); ++i; }
        }

        // scan over the lead-out quotation mark w/o adding it to the buffer
        if ( i < cmd.Length )
        {
            ++i;
        }            
        return;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Parse a bareword
    /// </summary>
    private void ParseBareWord()
    {            
        while ( i < cmd.Length )
        {
            char ch = cmd[i];
            if ( char.IsWhiteSpace( ch ) ) break; // whitespace terminates a bareword
            else if ( ch == '"' ) break; // lead-in quote starts a quoted word
            else if ( ch == '\\' ) break; // escape sequence terminates the bareword

            buf.Append(ch); // otherwise, keep reading this word                

            ++i;                
        }            
        return;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Parse an escape sequence of one or more backslashes followed an an optional trailing quotation mark
    /// </summary>
    private void ParseEscapeSequence()
    {
        //---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        // The rule is that:
        //
        // * An even number of backslashes followed by a quotation mark ('"') means that
        //   - the backslashes are escaped, so half that many get injected into the buffer, and
        //   - the quotation mark is a lead-in/lead-out quotation mark that marks the start of a quoted word
        //     which does not get added to the buffer.
        //
        // * An odd number of backslashes followed by a quotation mark ('"') means that
        //   - the backslashes are escaped, so half that many get injected into the buffer, and
        //   - the quotation mark is escaped. It's a literal quotation mark that also gets injected into the buffer
        //
        // * Any number of backslashes that aren't followed by a quotation mark ('"') have no special meaning:
        //   all of them get added to the buffer as-sis.
        //
        //---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        //
        // scan in the backslashes
        //
        int p = i; // start of the escape sequence
        while ( i < cmd.Length && cmd[i] == '\\' )
        {
            buf.Append( '\\' );
            ++i;
        }

        //
        // if the backslash sequence is followed by a quotation mark, it's an escape sequence
        //
        if ( i < cmd.Length && cmd[i] == '"' )
        {
            int n         = ( i - p ); // find the number of backslashes seen
            int quotient  = n >> 1; // n divide 2 ( 5 div 2 = 2 , 6 div 2 = 3 )
            int remainder = n & 1; // n modulo 2 ( 5 mod 2 = 1 , 6 mod 2 = 0 )

            buf.Length -= ( quotient + remainder ); // remove the unwanted backslashes

            if ( remainder != 0 )
            {
                // the trailing quotation mark is an escaped, literal quotation mark
                // add it to the buffer and increment the pointer
                buf.Append( '"' );
                ++i;
            }                
        }            
        return;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Consume inter-argument whitespace
    /// </summary>
    private void ConsumeWhitespace()
    {
        while ( i < cmd.Length && char.IsWhiteSpace( cmd[i] ) )
        {
            ++i;
        }
        return;
    }        
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        CommandLineParser parser      = new CommandLineParser();
        string            commandLine = RetrieveUnparsedCommandLine();
        int i = 0;

        IEnumerable<string> args = parser.Parse( commandLine );
        Console.WriteLine( "-------------------" );
        foreach ( string arg in args )
        {
            string template = i > 0 ? "argv[0:#0]" : "command";
            string label    = string.Format( template , i++ );

            Console.WriteLine( "{0}: {1}" , label , arg );

        }
        Console.WriteLine( "-------------------------" );            
        return;
    }

    static string RetrieveUnparsedCommandLine()
    {
        // get the raw command line. Source might be registry, config file, whatever
        string commandLine = Environment.CommandLine;
        return commandLine;
    }       
}

Good Luck.

share|improve this answer

Given a string which contains a presumably valid command line entry:

static string[] SplitArgs(string input)
{
    var args = new List<string>();
    var parts = input.Split(' ');

    for (int ii = 0; ii < parts.Length; ++ii)
    {
        // if it starts with a quote, search to the end
        // NB: this does not handle the case of --x="hello world"
        // an arguments post processor is required in that case
        if (parts[ii].StartsWith("\""))
        {
            var builder = new StringBuilder(parts[ii].Substring(0));
            while (ii + 1 < parts.Length
                && !parts[++ii].EndsWith("\""))
            {
                builder.Append(' ');
            }

            // if we made it here before the end of the string
            // it is the end of a quoted argument
            if (ii < parts.Length)
                builder.Append(parts[ii].Substring(0, parts[ii].Length - 1));

            args.Add(builder.ToString());
        }
        else
            args.Add(part[ii]);
    }

    return args.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but I need a generic method to do it, my application is not a ConsoleApplication –  Daniel Peñalba Feb 13 '12 at 19:18
    
Can you then expand on what you mean, is it a WinForms, WPF, etc? Or is it a library given a string or an array of strings? –  user7116 Feb 13 '12 at 19:20
    
I get the string from the user, from a file, this is the complete command line, and I need to differentiate between the executable and the arguments. –  Daniel Peñalba Feb 13 '12 at 19:22
    
Environment.GetcommandLineArgs() should still work, shouldn't it? –  cadrell0 Feb 13 '12 at 19:25
    
@cadrell0: not necessarily, in his case I believe it is coming from a file rather than the actual command line. –  user7116 Feb 13 '12 at 19:33

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