Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am wondering this question for a long time, how does PHP handle references are they a good idea to use and I can't explain better than using an example, lets look at the following class and then @ the comment of the setResult method.

Lets imagine we are using a model view controller framework and we are building a basic AjaxController, we only got 1 action method (getUsers) so far. Read the comments, and I hope my question is clear, how does PHP handle these kind of situations and is it true what I wrote about the x times in the memory @ the setResult docblock.

class AjaxController{
    private $json = array(
        'result' => array(),
        'errors' => array(),
        'debug' => array()
    );

    /**
     * Adds an error, always displayed to users if any errors.
     * 
     * @param type $description 
     */
    private function addError($description){
        $this->json['errors'][] = $description;
    }

    /**
     * Adds an debug message, these are displayed only with DEBUG_MODE.
     * 
     * @param type $description 
     */
    private function addDebug($description){
        $this->json['debug'][] = $description;
    }

    /**
     * QUESTION: How does this go in memory? Cause if I use no references,
     * the array would be 3 times in the memory, if the array is big (5000+)
     * its pretty much a waste of resources.
     * 
     * 1st time in memory @ model result.
     * 2th time in memory @ setResult ($resultSet variable)
     * 3th time in memory @ $this->json
     *
     * @param array $resultSet 
     */
    private function setResult($resultSet){
        $this->json['result'] = $resultSet;
    }

    /**
     * Gets all the users
     */
    public function _getUsers(){
        $users = new Users();
        $this->setResult($users->getUsers());
    }

    public function __construct(){
        if(!DEBUG_MODE && count($this->json['debug']) > 0){
            unset($this->json['debug']);
        }

        if(count($this->json['errors']) > 0){
            unset($this->json['errors']);
        }

        echo json_encode($this->json);
    }
}

Another simple example: What would be better to use technique A:

function example(){
    $latestRequest = $_SESSION['abc']['test']['abc'];

    if($latestRequest === null){
        $_SESSION['abc']['test']['abc'] = 'test';
    }
}

Or technique B:

function example(){
    $latestRequest =& $_SESSION['abc']['test']['abc'];

    if($latestRequest === null){
        $latestRequest = 'test';
    }
}

Thanks for reading and advise :)

share|improve this question
1  
PHP manual page on references: http://php.net/manual/en/language.references.php – bfavaretto Feb 13 '12 at 19:20
up vote 2 down vote accepted

In short: don't use references.

PHP copies on write. Consider:

$foo = "a large string";
$bar = $foo; // no copy
$zed = $foo; // no copy
$bar .= 'test'; // $foo is duplicated at this point.
                // $zed and $foo still point to the same string

You should only use references when you need the functionality that they provide. i.e., You need to modify the original array or scalar via a reference to it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, I now understand it. I just added another example, it would be awesome if you could take a look at that and advise me which technique is better to use. Once again, thanks :) – randomKek Feb 13 '12 at 19:53
    
@MikeVercoelen, your second example where you set something that has been referenced is an appropriate usage of references, because you need that functionality to update the original data. It's not going to speed things up in any noticeable way, so don't use it because of that. Also, when you are done with a reference, you should unset() it to avoid accidentally reusing it later. And I realize the example was contrived, but generally a better solution is to avoid such complicated nested arrays altogether. Usually it means an object is more appropriate, which will lessen the need for refs. – Matthew Feb 13 '12 at 20:04
    
If you find yourself in a situation where such a complex array is appropriate, then I would tend to use a reference as your example does just because it eliminates copy/paste errors. But this part of the answer is basically an opinion which people are free to disagree with. – Matthew Feb 13 '12 at 20:09
    
thanks for the great description, and also about the unset, I really miss the lack of an article on how to write good PHP code, you know everyone has it's own coding techniques, and every tutorial tells you how to write a class, but no one explains how to think in code, how to write code in certain ways etc. – randomKek Feb 13 '12 at 22:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.