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I have the following to classes(POCO's?) where the second is supposed to extend the first.

I am guessing I need a property referencing the base instance, Business in this case, but do I also need a Constructor to "fill" that property since an Insurance Company can't exist without a Business?

My reference for this is the underlying DB where tblInsuranceCompany has a FK constraint on column BusinessID back to tblBusiness.

Additionally, I am very new at OOP so please point out anything else you may see "wrong". Thanks,

public class Business
{
    public int BusinessID { get; set; }

    public BusinessType BusinessType { get; set; }

    public string Name { get; set; }

    public string ContactName { get; set; }

    public string EmailAddress { get; set; }

    public DateTime? InactiveDate { get; set; }

    public IList<Address> Addresses { get; set; }

    public IList<Phone> Phones { get; set; }

    public string DisplayString { get { return this.ToString(); } }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("{0}: {1}", Name, BusinessType.TypeDescription);
    }
}

public class InsuranceCompany : Business
{
    public int InsuranceCompanyID { get; set; }

    public Business Business { get; set; }

    public InsuranceCompanyType InsuranceCompanyType { get; set; }

    public string DRIInsuranceCompanyNumber { get; set; }

    public string DisplayString { get { return this.ToString(); } }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return String.Format("{0}: {1}", Business.Name, InsuranceCompanyType.TypeDescription);
    }
}
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6  
Is InsuranceCompany "is-a" Business or "has-a" Business? You're doing both, which is wrong. –  SLaks Feb 13 '12 at 20:29
    
@SLaks: So the Inheritance (:Business) defines a "is-a" but the property public Business Business defines a "has-a"? If that's correct then thank you for clarifying that for me. I knew the difference between the 2 I have just never had it applied to "work code" if you know what I mean. Thanks! –  Refracted Paladin Feb 13 '12 at 20:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am guessing I need a property referencing the base instance, Business in this case,

No, you don't need this. The InsuranceCompany is the business. It will also have all of the properties of Business since it inherits from Business. You don't need a property to reference this, as the reference to the InsuranceCompany object will be the same reference as the reference to the "business" portion (they're the same object).

but do I also need a Constructor to "fill" that property since an Insurance Company can't exist without a Business?

All classes get a constructor - When you construct an InsuranceCompany, it will effectively construct the "business" as well.

That being said, you may want a constructor that passes the relevant information to the base class constructor - but if you don't provide one, the compiler will create a default constructor for you.

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Thanks, that makes sense but leads to another question, If I add a Constructor that means this is no longer a POCO, correct? I should have another class then or am I confusing the two. –  Refracted Paladin Feb 13 '12 at 20:35
    
@RefractedPaladin You can have a constructor and still be a POCO - though it's typically nice to have a default constructor in addition to any that take arguments, depending on teh usage scenario... –  Reed Copsey Feb 13 '12 at 20:41
    
Thanks and thanks for answering my inane questions. –  Refracted Paladin Feb 13 '12 at 20:44

I'm not quite sure, if you are confusing inheritance with composition here.

If InsuranceCompany is a type of business, then inheritance would be a possible solution. In this case you don't need a Business property, the object itself is a business and has all the properties thereof. The InsuranceCompany and Business are not two different instances, they are one.

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You can just use the Name property (or base.Name) in InsuranceCompany and remove the Business property from the derived class.

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