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I'm partial to using member initialization lists with my constructors... but I've long since forgotten the reasons behind this...

Do you use member initialization lists in your constructors? If so, why? If not, why not?

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up vote 116 down vote accepted

For POD class members, it makes no difference, it's just a matter of style. For class members which are classes, then it avoids an unnecessary call to a default constructor. Consider:

class A
{
public:
    A() { x = 0; }
    A(int x_) { x = x_; }
    int x;
};

class B
{
public:
    B()
    {
        a.x = 3;
    }
private:
    A a;
};

In this case, the constructor for B will call the default constructor for A, and then initialize a.x to 3. A better way would be for B's constructor to directly call A's constructor in the initializer list:

B()
  : a(3)
{
}

This would only call A's A(int) constructor and not its default constructor. In this example, the difference is negligible, but imagine if you will that A's default constructor did more, such as allocating memory or opening files. You wouldn't want to do that unnecessarily.

Furthermore, if a class doesn't have a default constructor, or you have a const member variable, you must use an initialize list:

class A
{
public:
    A(int x_) { x = x_; }
    int x;
}

class B
{
public:
    B() : a(3), y(2)  // 'a' and 'y' MUST be initialized in an initializer list;
    {                 // it is an error not to do so
    }
private:
    A a;
    const int y;
};
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class members which are classes can be POD, too – phresnel Mar 21 '13 at 15:24
    
a must is also for important case of a reference – tinky_winky May 6 '14 at 12:38
    
Why not use "a(3);" or "a = A(3);" in the body of B's default constructor? – Sergey Mar 6 '15 at 10:07
1  
Could you explain, what you mean with POD? – Jonas Stein Nov 19 '15 at 11:12

Apart from the performance reasons mentioned above, if your class stores references to objects passed as constructor parameters or your class has const variables then you don't have any choice except using initializer lists.

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3  
Same goes for const members I believe. – Richard Corden May 29 '09 at 16:44

But remember that the order of initialization is the order that the members are declared in the class, not the order of the initialization list.

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This doesn't answer the question, it should be a comment. – Matthew Read Oct 23 '15 at 17:44
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – wilx Oct 24 '15 at 16:30

Before the body of the constructor is run, all of the constructors for its parent class and then for its fields are invoked. By default, the no-argument constructors are invoked. Initialization lists allow you to choose which constructor is called and what arguments that constructor receives.

If you have a reference or a const field, or if one of the classes used does not have a default constructor, you must use an initialization list.

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Next to the performance issues, there is another one very important which I'd call code maintainability and extendibility.

If a T is POD and you start preferring initialization list, then if one time T will change to a non-POD type, you won't need to change anything around initialization to avoid unnecessary constructor calls because it is already optimised.

If type T does have default constructor and one or more user-defined constructors and one time you decide to remove or hide the default one, then if initialization list was used, you don't need to update code if your user-defined constructors because they are already correctly implemented.

Same with const members or reference members, let's say initially T is defined as follows:

struct T
{
    T() { a = 5; }
private:
    int a;
};

Next, you decide to qualify a as const, if you would use initialization list from the beginning, then this was a single line change, but having the T defined as above, it also requires to dig the constructor definition to remove assignment:

struct T
{
    T() : a(5) {} // 2. that requires changes here too
private:
    const int a; // 1. one line change
};

It's not a secret that maintenance is far easier and less error-prone if code was written not by a "code monkey" but by an engineer who makes decisions based on deeper consideration about what he is doing.

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+1 for "code monkey " – Invictus Sep 19 '12 at 6:54
// Without Initializer List
class MyClass {
    Type variable;
public:
    MyClass(Type a) {  // Assume that Type is an already
                     // declared class and it has appropriate 
                     // constructors and operators
        variable = a;
    }
};

Here compiler follows following steps to create an object of type MyClass
1. Type’s constructor is called first for “a”.
2. The assignment operator of “Type” is called inside body of MyClass() constructor to assign

variable = a;
  1. And then finally destructor of “Type” is called for “a” since it goes out of scope.

    Now consider the same code with MyClass() constructor with Initializer List

    // With Initializer List
     class MyClass {
    Type variable;
    public:
    MyClass(Type a):variable(a) {   // Assume that Type is an already
                     // declared class and it has appropriate
                     // constructors and operators
    }
    };
    

    With the Initializer List, following steps are followed by compiler:

    1. Copy constructor of “Type” class is called to initialize : variable(a). The arguments in initializer list are used to copy construct “variable” directly.
    2. Destructor of “Type” is called for “a” since it goes out of scope.
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1  
While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation out of the code really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! meta.stackexchange.com/q/114762/308249 – davejal Nov 25 '15 at 3:12

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