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I was hoping to tie our site in with Chrome's Address Autofill, but I can't find any reference for how it expects the forms to be presented.

I'm guessing it's looking for something pretty specific in the name= fields of the forms, but a good reference would be nice, instead of having to reverse engineer it.

At the moment, Chrome fills none of our forms, but Safari fills most of them. At the risk of asking two questions at once: anyone got a reference for safari as well? Safari seems to be using our title= fields...

It doesn't use this standard, does it? http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc3106.txt

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thanks for the tip. I did a bunch of searching, but didn't find this one. Still, it looks like it's the wild west out there. –  Alec Feb 13 '12 at 22:18
    
@Alec: I think your best best it to look at Chromium's code directly, if that's really the only browser you want to target. See my answer. –  haylem Feb 29 '12 at 1:26
    
@Alec: did that answer your question? –  haylem Mar 7 '12 at 22:52
    

1 Answer 1

There are a bunch of stuff that could be "expected" (like things in RFC3106 or the hCard format) but in the end it comes down to what you can find in the Chromium source code, I guess.

This specific section which seems to be Chromium's AutoFill implementation is probably of interest for you, which I found by using the Google Code Search feature for Chromium now available via Google Code Project Hosting.

Some of the constants are extern-ed used for regular expressions are defined in autofill_regex_constants.h and provided in a fairly extensive list (even with I18N support!) in autofill_regex_constants.cc.utf8.

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