Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Tomcat 6.0.33 with Java 6. I have this servlet ...

public class SaveXmlServlet extends HttpServlet {

private CacheService cacheService;

public void init(ServletConfig config) throws ServletException {
    cacheService = CacheServiceLocator.cacheService();
}   // init

How can I redesign my servlet to ...

  1. Take advantage of dependency injection so that a mocking framework like mockito can inject its own "cacheService" implementation
  2. Guarantee that there is only one instance of cacheservice in my jvm. Right now the line "CacheServiceLocator.cacheService()" guarantees this.

? I'm not using (or allowed to use) frameworks like Spring or Guice. Grateful for any thoughts on refactoring this. Thanks, - Dave

share|improve this question
2  
"I'm not using (or allowed to use) frameworks like Spring or Guice." Well, reinvent one yourself. They are open source, so that you can get some insights. But... How does reinventing the wheel make sense? I'd concentrate on solving the "I'm not allowed" problem. That's much bigger than your current problem. –  BalusC Feb 13 '12 at 21:52
    
But technical problems are so much easier! –  Dave Newton Feb 13 '12 at 21:55
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few options, although I recommend smacking someone for not "letting" you use a framework. Two quickies; I'm sure there are others. I'd go the smacking route first.

You can mock static classes using a combination of EasyMock/Mockito and, say, PowerMock. Technically you don't need to change anything at all to get the in-test behavior you want.

A class name provided by a servlet init parameter or JNDI resource could be used to create an instance of the cache locator. Providing a setter for the same allows a unit/etc. test to set it on the class.

share|improve this answer
    
Regarding, "A class name provided by a servlet init parameter or JNDI resource could be used to create an instance of the cache locator", could you provide a code sample b/c I'm not seeing it yet. Also, I don't care about CacheServiceLocator per se, as long as I can control how the "cacheService" member field is set in my JUnit test vs my normal application. Thanks, - –  Dave Feb 14 '12 at 14:37
    
@Dave ... Not sure what else I can add, use a string class name to create a new instance of the implementation in the "live" system, use a setter in the test. –  Dave Newton Feb 14 '12 at 14:46
    
Oh, that's clear now ... I forgot the use of class instantiation through the Class.forName method (or whatever that was). Your solution is greatly appreciated, - –  Dave Feb 14 '12 at 18:49
    
@Dave Ah, gotcha. No problem; hope it helps. Or at least doesn't make anything worse ;) –  Dave Newton Feb 14 '12 at 19:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.