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Something happens in my system on a worker thread. Let's say that the state changes. I want to handle the new state in the UI thread, so I dispatch a delegate to be invoked there:

var state = GetState();
Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => StateChanged(state));

When StateChanged executes on the UI thread, can I then be sure that the value of the parameter state is the value returned by GetState() before the dispatch, or will the temporary state variable be optimized away so that GetState() is called on the UI thread to populate the StateChanged parameter?

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2  
Welcome to the wonderful world of closures. That's perfectly fine. –  SLaks Feb 13 '12 at 23:52

4 Answers 4

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can I then be sure that the value of the parameter state is the value returned by GetState() before the dispatch or will the temporary state variable be optimized > away

No state won't be optimized away. However, Before is actually the tricky part about this question. As long as you are not changing the state variable after (in the same scope) you have nothing to worry about.

{
 // say GetState returns 2
 var state = GetState(); 
 // state now = 2
 Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => StateChanged(state)); 
 state = 3; 
}

In the code above state won't be optimized away. It does not mean, however, that StateChanged will be invoked with value 2. It could be 3, if the worker thread completes execution before starting the dispatcher thread.

The main point here is that variable capturing insures that the value is preserved for the use of the closure, but that does not mean that the value is immutable.

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No, GetState will definitely be called on the worker thread. An "optimization" to move the GetState() call within the lambda expression would be entirely invalid.

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This will not happen as it would change the semantics of the operations, optimizations are not allowed to do that; you make an assignment to a variable by calling a method, so because C# is not a lazy language this will have to happen at that point.

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Your code

var state = GetState();
Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => StateChanged(state));

is fine. But this variation would be much more difficult to analyze and prove correct:

var state = GetState();
Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(() => StateChanged(state));  // after GetState()
state = null;                       // before or after StateChanged() ?
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That variation is actually very easy to prove wrong. –  SLaks Feb 14 '12 at 0:13
    
@SLaks: Please elaborate... –  Johann Gerell Feb 14 '12 at 7:26
    
Slaks is right - with this code StateChanged will always see state==null. I was thinking about a Thread. –  Henk Holterman Feb 14 '12 at 8:39
    
A thread would have exactly the same issue. @JohannGerell: Henk explained it perfectly. –  SLaks Feb 14 '12 at 17:17

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