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I am in the process of learning java recurrence but am stuck on the following question.

void f(int n) {
    if (n<=1) return;
    f(n/2);
    System.out.writeln("still continuing...");
    f(n/2);
    f(n/2);
}

I have two questions about this.

  1. if we say that T(n) is the number of lines that the program prints and n is the input, what would be the recurrence formula for T(n)?

  2. How do I go about solving the recurrence from question 1 without using master theorem?

cheers

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Please do not abuse the tags field. –  SLaks Feb 14 '12 at 0:02
    
The tags you previously posted had nothing to do with this question, which is about algorithms and not programming languages. I replaced those with tags appropriate to an algorithms problem. –  Adam Mihalcin Feb 14 '12 at 0:03
    
sorry I didn't know what to fill the other 4 tags with as this is only recursion. –  erik gonzalez Feb 14 '12 at 0:04
    
Is this homework? –  doelleri Feb 14 '12 at 0:05
1  
You don't actually have to use all 5 tags. –  nbarraille Feb 14 '12 at 0:46
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2 Answers

Let's begin with a formula for the value of T(n). We know the following:

  1. Calling f with 0 or 1 as arguments takes time O(1)
  2. Calling f with a larger value makes three calls to f(n / 2), and does a constant amount of other work.

Consequently, we can get the following recurrence:

  • T(1) ≤ 1
  • T(n) ≤ 3T(n / 2) + 1

Notice that I'm using a "+ 1" term here instead of a "+ O(1)" term. This is mathematically iffy, but since we're looking for a final result expressed in big-O notation anyway, this will not be too much of a problem.

Now, how would we go about trying to solve this? One option would be to plug in some arbitrary value for n and see what happens. We begin with (assuming n > 1) that

T(n) ≤ 3T(n / 2) + 1

Now, let's think about those calls to T(n / 2). If n / 2 > 1, then we get that

T(n) ≤ 3T(n / 2) + 1

≤ 3(3T(n / 4) + 1) + 1

= 9T(n / 4) + 3 + 1

Now, let's expand this out a gain:

T(n) ≤ 9T(n / 4) + 3 + 1

≤ 9(3T(n / 8) + 3) + 3 + 1

= 27T(n / 8) + 9 + 3 + 1

At this point, we can see a pattern emerging. After i iterations of the recursion, we have that the total work done is

T(n) = 3iT(n / 2i) + sum(i = 0 to i - 1)3i

This process terminates when n / 2i ≤ 1, which occurs when i ≈ lg n. If we plug in lg n, we get

T(n) ≤ 3lg nT(1) + sum(i = 0 to i - 1)3i)

≤ 3lg n + sum(i = 0 to i - 1)3lg n

Now, 3lg n = 3(log3 n / log3 2) = 3log3 n1 / log3 2 = n1 / log3 2, so this entire thing is

T(n) ≤ n1 / log3 2 + sum(i = 0 to (lg n) - 1)3i

Using the formula for sums of geometric series, this last term is (3lg n - 1) / 2, which ends up expanding out to O(n1 / log3 2), so overall this expression is O(n1 / log3 2).

But this formula is really ugly. Can we simplify it? Well, we do have this:

1 / log3 2 = log2 3

Which gives us that the runtime is O(nlg 3), which is about O(n1.58).

Hope this helps!

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T(n) = 3* T(n/2)+ O(1)

As the theorem indicates, the answer should be O(n^(lg 3)).

For more details, you can refer to the Introduction to Algorithm by Cormen et, see chapter 4. The solving of recurrance equations are quite complicated. But normally the method is first guess, then prove using substitution.

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I think that the OP's question is, specifically, how to solve this without using the Master THeorem. Though the CLRS reference is definitely great! –  templatetypedef Feb 14 '12 at 4:24
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