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I'm storing large arrays of friends and followers from twitter to MongoDB. I'm surprised I hit the 16MB limit, but I guess it's understandable if I'm grabbing users w/ >2M followers. Is there anyway around this?

I'm doing a social analysis project, and would be looking through these arrays frequently.

Below is my error:

...in `serialize': Document too large: This BSON documents is limited to 16777216 bytes. (BSON::InvalidDocument)

Also using the Mongo Ruby gem, a Ruby answer would be pref :)

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MongoDB isn't really meant for that kind of analysis. Did you ever consider a graph DB like Neo4J? –  Mark Thomas Feb 14 '12 at 0:48
    
Oh looks great. I just read on the internet Mongo is great for Storing Twitter material. Didn't realize I would hit these type of limits on Day 1. Thanks for the note :) –  Mr. Demetrius Michael Feb 14 '12 at 1:29

1 Answer 1

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This will not work as you would like it to. MongoDB does allow for some denormalization, but you cannot denormalize 2M items into a single parent, as you saw with the space concerns.

In SQL, you would implement this as two tables. You can implement this as two collections with MongoDB. It may seem sub-optimal, but it represents the same total amount of work in either MongoDB or SQL.

That stated, MongoDB may not be the "NoSQL" DB you are looking for. Graph Databases like Neo4J are designed for analysis of highly connected data. Also, Redis supports lists without a size limit, so this too may be a better fit.

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Neo4J seems like what I need for this particular bit of the project, and actual storing of tweets maybe Mongol. Or would you recommend not mixing two databases? Redis looks interesting too, thanks for the pointer. Found a cool link on the internet as well: kkovacs.eu/cassandra-vs-mongodb-vs-couchdb-vs-redis that compares them all. Would you say that the information there is accurate? –  Mr. Demetrius Michael Feb 14 '12 at 3:27
    
As mentioned, Neo4J seems the right choice here. –  techpaisa Feb 14 '12 at 6:12

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