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Is it possible to encode the route a packet should take to a destination? Say I know the computer I am trying to get to on a local network. I presume can use its router as a "gateway" to that subnet, but what if the computer I am trying to get to is on a sub-subnet? Then I have to specify: gateway1-->gateway2-->destination.

My router can only get me to gateway1, and gateway1 can only get me to gateway2, which in turn can get me to my destination.

Is there a way to encode a route in the packet?

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No. Routing is determined by the various network connections and assumes the network is set up correctly. If your destination requires that you go through GW1 and then GW2, those routes between networks must exist correctly. –  Joe Feb 14 '12 at 0:45
    
Ok, but then how is it that you can only send information through one gateway? It seems like you should be able to repeat the process of saying "go here first" when you send a packet to a gateway. –  Feynman Feb 14 '12 at 0:51
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Because it is that gateway's responsibility to know where to send packets for networks it does not know about. This is what RIP and OSPF do. The endpoint does not have the information necessary to decide how to route; the network does, so that is where routing decisions are made. –  Joe Feb 14 '12 at 1:23
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As a matter of fact source IP routing is possible, but not really used anymore in IP networks for security reasons. –  ldx Feb 14 '12 at 15:33
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