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When working with the List class from System.Collections.Generic, methods like Contains or IndexOf will compare the passed reference's object using either the Equals method implemented from IEquatable, or the overridden Equals method provided by the Object class. If Object.Equals is not overridden, it will check whether the passed reference points to the same object as itself.

My question is: Is there a way of making List compare by reference if Equals is overridden? The code below will remove the item from the list:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {    
        var s1 = new SomeClass() { A = 5 };
        var s2 = new SomeClass() { A = 5 };
        var list = new List<SomeClass>();
        list.Add(s1);
        list.Remove(s2); // s1 will get removed, even though s2 has been 
                         // passed, because s1's Equals method will return true.

    }
}

class SomeClass
{
    public int A { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        SomeClass s = obj as SomeClass;
        if (s == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return s.A == this.A;
        }
    }   
}

Let's say I'm unable to remove SomeClass' implementation of Equals, is there a way of making List compare by reference instead of value?

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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use List.RemoveAll and in your predicate, compare the items with Object.ReferenceEquals.

list.RemoveAll(item => object.ReferenceEquals(item, s2));

The code did successfully remove the 1 items when debugging from Visual Studio 2010 Express.

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Thanks, that seems to work just fine. –  haiyyu Feb 14 '12 at 1:31
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Austin's solution is simple and work. But here are two generic extension methods as well:

items.RemoveAllByReference(item);

public static void RemoveAllByReference<T>(this List<T> list, T item)
{
    list.RemoveAll(x=> object.ReferenceEquals(x, item));
}

public static bool RemoveFirstByReference<T>(this List<T> list, T item)
{
    var index = -1;
    for(int i = 0; i< list.Count; i++)
        if(object.ReferenceEquals(list[i], item))
        {
            index = i;
            break;
        }
    if(index == -1)
        return false;

    list.RemoveAt(index);
    return true;
}
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Interesting but why is this more optimal - isn't this similar to what the predicate does internally ? Just like to know your reasoning... –  Russ C Feb 14 '12 at 1:39
    
What if the item is in the list n times? –  Austin Salonen Feb 14 '12 at 1:43
    
Austin's method always checks all element. This one breaks the loop when it finds one. But now when I think of it, it may be more correct to search the whole list and remove all instances of the same item in a list ... So it depends on what you want. But still, an extension method is an advantage if you use it on several places. –  doblak Feb 14 '12 at 1:44
    
@Austin, yes you are right, the name was misguiding, I altered the names. Two extension methods, now those do what it says. –  doblak Feb 14 '12 at 1:49
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