Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If i have a class that creates a new object and passes a refrence to this() to that new object, should i just use this() or should i create a declaration to that class and pass the declaration instead. I cant seem to find a clear example of when i would use each case when passing a handle to a child object.

public class ThisClass {

    ThisClass decHandle;
    ThisClass someThing = this;
    public String decString = "some string";
    SomeOtherClass classObject1 = new SomeOtherClass(this);
    SomeOtherClass classObject2 = new SomeOtherClass(decHandle);
    SomeOtherClass classObject3 = new SomeOtherClass(someThing);

}

public class SomeOtherClass {

    ThisClass decHandle;
    public SomeOtherClass (ThisClass handle){
        decHandle = handle; 
    }
    String valueForOther = decHandle.someThing;

}

I mostly need to know which is the best practice when passing handles to a child class from the parent.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are quite a few mistakes here.

1) The last statement in SomeOtherClass should be

String valueForOther = decHandle.decString;

instead of

String valueForOther = decHandle.someThing;

2) When you say

SomeOtherClass classObject1 = new SomeOtherClass(this);

it will throw a NullPointerException, because you have not yet constructed the object. "this" refers to the current object. In your code, there is no object, therefore this line will throw an exception. The same applies to the next line.

3) "Child" means that the class inherits from a parent. Just because SomeOtherClass has a reference to ThisClass, it doesn't mean that SomeOtherClass is a child.

4) It's not a good practice to let a class' members have public visibility.

Ok, so here's how you would do it.

public class ThisClass 
{
    private String decString = "some string";
    private SomeOtherClass someOtherClass;

    public ThisClass()
    {
        someOtherClass = new SomeOtherClass(this);
    }

    public String getDecString()
    {
        return decString;   
    }
}

public class SomeOtherClass 
{

    private ThisClass decHandle;
    private String valueForOther;

    public SomeOtherClass (ThisClass handle)
    {
        decHandle = handle;
        valueForOther = decHandle.getDecString(); 
    }  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you CodeBlue thats exactly the information i needed to know on accessing information between a class and the class that created it. I'm still working on learning to shift my mindset to object oriented and also java – Xyberviri Feb 14 '12 at 4:49
    
Just an update, This was exactly the information i needed at the time to start playing with java code while reading as much as possible. Coming from a background that mainly was php, perl and js I didn't have a good foundation to learn java and OOP at the same time. I was also having problems grasping how to call one object from another once I created it and released it off into ram. This is mainly because i learn by coding by looking at existing code and taking it apart. Thanks again CodeBlue and El developer for the assistance – Xyberviri May 4 '12 at 1:17

Do this:

SomeOtherClass classObject1 = new SomeOtherClass(this);

Creating an instance variable that points to this doesn't achieve anything: You're just duplicating what this does anyway.

EDIT: Remember that variables (other than primitives) are all references in Java, so this and someThing in your example both point to the same object. It then doesn't matter which one you pass to SomeOtherClass; it will receive a reference to the same object either way.

The handle local variable in SomeOtherClass doesn't know or care where its reference came from.

Note that in your example ThisClass.decHandle is null because you have not assigned a value to it. (In fact ThisClass probably won't compile because of the uninitialized value, but I haven't tested that)

share|improve this answer

Best practice is to use this when you need to pass a reference to "this" object. That's what it is there for (among other things). If you try to avoid using it you end up making your code more verbose and less readable and / or using more memory at runtime.

(The use of this for other purposes (e.g. to distinguish fields and locals) is debatable, but it is hard to make a convincing case that it is "best practice" ... or not. Anyway, that's a different question.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.