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I'm writing a JavaScript parser with Happy and I need to match a regular expression. I don't want to fully parse the regex, just store it as a string.

The relevant part of my AST looks like this:

data PrimaryExpr
    -- | Literal integer
    = ExpLitInt     Integer
    -- | Literal strings
    | ExpLitStr     String
    -- | Identifier
    | ExpId         String
    -- | Bracketed expression
    | ExpBrackExp   Expression
    -- | This (current object)
    | ExpThis
    -- | Regular Expression
    | ExpRegex      String
    -- | Arrays
    | ExpArray      ArrayLit
    -- | Objects
    | ExpObject     [(PropName, Assignment)]
    deriving Show

This is the relevant Happy code:

primaryExpr :: { PrimaryExpr }
    : LITINT          { ExpLitInt $1 }
    | LITSTR          { ExpLitStr $1 }
    | ID              { ExpId $1 }
    | THIS            { ExpThis }
    | regex           { ExpRegex $1 }
    | arrayLit        { ExpArray $1 }
    | objectLit       { ExpObject $1 }
    | '(' expression ')' { ExpBrackExp $2 }

My question is, how should I define my regex non-terminal? Is this kind of structure right?

regex :: { String }
    : '/' whatHere? '/' { $2 }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should define regex as a terminal that is recognized by the lexer (i.e. LITREGEX).

primaryExpr :: { PrimaryExpr }
    : LITINT          { ExpLitInt $1 }
    | LITSTR          { ExpLitStr $1 }
    | LITREGEX        { ExpRegex $1 }
    | ID              { ExpId $1 }
    | THIS            { ExpThis }
    | arrayLit        { ExpArray $1 }
    | objectLit       { ExpObject $1 }
    | '(' expression ')' { ExpBrackExp $2 }
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, good idea. That leads on to the next question - how do I get an Alex lexer to match a regular expression? (I could ask this as a separate question if you think that's a better idea?) –  Nick Brunt Feb 14 '12 at 2:27
    
I'm no Alex expert, but something like \/[^\/]*\/ { \s -> LITREGEX . init . tail $ s }. This doesn't allow for escaped /'s in the regex. YMMV –  pat Feb 14 '12 at 2:33
    
To do this properly, you'll need to deal with backslash-escaped /'s, and /'s inside character classes. –  pat Feb 14 '12 at 2:36
    
Yes, that's the problem I'm coming up with. It's perfect other than that though. It matches simple regexes, just not ones with escaped forward slashes. I'll work on it, thank you! –  Nick Brunt Feb 14 '12 at 2:43
    
Final solution: \/([^\/]|\\\/)*\/[gim]* { \s -> Regex s } –  Nick Brunt Feb 14 '12 at 3:01

To answer the question in the comment, need a bit more room.

Something like (spaced out and commented):

/             forward slash
(  \\.        either: an escaped character
|  [^\[/\\]           anything which isn't / or [ or \
|  \[                 a character class containing:
     [^\]]*              anything which isn't ] any number of times
   \]                   
)*            any number of times
/             forward slash

Condensed:

/(\\.|[^\[/\\]|\[[^\]]*\])*/
share|improve this answer
    
This is great, cheers. I think it's nicer than mine anyway. I had to escape the forward slashes and add modifiers so here is the end product: \/(\\.|[^\[\/]|\[[^\]]*\])*\/[gim]* { \s -> Regex s } –  Nick Brunt Feb 14 '12 at 4:10
    
I was going to say I wasn't sure what you'd need to escape for Happy but you seem to have figured it out :) –  Porges Feb 14 '12 at 4:41
    
Character classes allow the first character to be a ] without it closing the class –  pat Feb 14 '12 at 5:07
    
@pat: sometimes. Not in Javascript. I got bitten by this recently :) Here it is in Chrome: i.imgur.com/UFtKt.png –  Porges Feb 14 '12 at 5:12
    
@porges good to know. Thanks –  pat Feb 14 '12 at 5:14

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