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I was looking for a constructor or a init function for following situation:

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;
}; 
Abc.prototype.init = function(){
   // Perform some operation
};

//Creating a new Abc object using Constructor.

var currentAbc = new Abc(obj,obj);

//currently I write this statement:
currentAbc.init();

Is there a way to call init function when new object is initialized?

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Put it in the contructor. –  James Hay Feb 14 '12 at 3:34
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can just call init() from the constructor function

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;
   this.init();
}; 

Here is a fiddle demonstrating: http://jsfiddle.net/CHvFk/

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Perhaps something like this?

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;
    this.init = function(){
        // Do things here.
    }
    this.init();
}; 
var currentAbc = new Abc(obj,obj);
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This is correct, you must call the init() function AFTER you define it. –  Wes Mar 17 at 18:46
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if your init method should stay private :

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
   function privateInit(){ console.log(this.aProperty);}   
   this.aProperty = aProperty;
   this.bProperty = bProperty;

   privateInit.apply(this);
};

i like this more.

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Why not put the stuff in init function to cunstructor, like this:

var Abc = function(aProperty,bProperty){
    this.aProperty = aProperty;
    this.bProperty = bProperty;

    // Perform some operation

}; 
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Why are functions being used? To reduce redundancy and modularity of your code. Thats why I want it as a function. –  emphaticsunshine Feb 14 '12 at 3:40
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