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A = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), '..')

B = os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__))

C = os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))

I usually just hardwire these with the actual path. But there is a reason for these statements that determine path at runtime, and I would really like to understant the os.path module so I can start using it.

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Obviously, it's not a wildcard. –  tripleee Feb 14 '12 at 4:59
    
Its a "magic" variable; wildcard means something quite different. –  Aaron Dufour Feb 14 '12 at 5:47

5 Answers 5

When a module is loaded in Python, __file__ is set to its name. You can then use that with other functions to find the directory that the file is located in.

Taking your examples one at a time:

A = os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), '..')
# A is the parent directory of the directory where program resides.

B = os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__))
# B is the canonicalised (?) directory where the program resides.

C = os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))
# C is the absolute path of the directory where the program resides.

You can see the various values returned from these here:

import os
print __file__
print os.path.join(os.path.dirname(__file__), '..')
print os.path.dirname(os.path.realpath(__file__))
print os.path.abspath(os.path.dirname(__file__))

and make sure you run it from different locations (such as ./text.py, ~/python/text.py and so forth) to see what difference that makes.

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1  
Good answer, but see other an important detail from other answers: __file__ is NOT defined in all cases, e.g. statically linked C modules. We can't count on __file__ always being available. –  Chris Johnson Feb 18 at 15:46

I just want to address some confusion first. __file__ is not a wildcard it is an attribute. Double underscore attributes and methods are considered to be "special" by convention and serve a special purpose.

http://docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html shows many of the special methods and attributes, if not all of them.

In this case __file__ is an attribute of a module (a module object). In Python a .py file is a module. So import amodule will have an attribute of __file__ which means different things under difference circumstances.

Taken from the docs:

__file__ is the pathname of the file from which the module was loaded, if it was loaded from a file. The __file__ attribute is not present for C modules that are statically linked into the interpreter; for extension modules loaded dynamically from a shared library, it is the pathname of the shared library file.

In your case the module is accessing it's own __file__ attribute in the global namespace.

To see this in action try:

# file: test.py

print globals()
print __file__

And run:

python test.py

{'__builtins__': <module '__builtin__' (built-in)>, '__name__': '__main__', '__file__':
 'test_print__file__.py', '__doc__': None, '__package__': None}
test_print__file__.py
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__file__ is the name of the current file, like main.py.

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_file_ is the pathname of the file from which the module was loaded, if it was loaded from a file. The file attribute is not present for C modules that are statically linked into the interpreter; for extension modules loaded dynamically from a shared library, it is the pathname of the shared library file.

Hope it helps

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Using __file__ combined with various os.path modules lets all paths be relative the current module's directory location. This allows your modules/projects to be portable to other machines.

In your project you do:

A = '/Users/myname/Projects/mydevproject/somefile.txt'

and then try to deploy it to your server with a deployments directory like /home/web/mydevproject/ then your code won't be able to find the paths correctly.

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