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I have the following problem at hand. There is a class, Foo and another one called Bar which is a member of class Foo.

class Bar{
private:
    some stuff;
public:
    Bar();
    some other_stuff;
};
class Foo{
private:
    Bar bar;
public:
    Foo(); // Initialize the bar object here in the constructor
    void doSomethingWithBar();
};

Now both classes are huge! For some application, I need to make changes to both Foo and Bar and so there are Foo_Derived and Bar_Derived classes.

class Bar_Derived: public Bar{
private:
    some NEW_stuff;
public:
    Bar_Derived();
    some New_other_stuff;
};
class Foo_Derived: public Foo{
private:
    Bar_Derived bar;
public:
    Foo_Derived(); 
    void doSomethingWithBar();
};

As far as I understand inheritance, once Foo_Derived() is called, the base class constructor for Foo is also called which initializes the bar object in the base class (of type Bar. What should I do so that the bar object in the derived class is used instead? (of type Bar_Derived). I only need the base class (Foo) to initialize the base part of the bar object and do the rest in the Foo_Derived class myself. Is this even possible?

Sorry if the question is not clear. I'm just really confused myself!

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It is not possible to inherit a part of a class. –  n.m. Feb 14 '12 at 4:00
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The base class initializer only does initialize the base part of the object, since that's all it knows about. A class initializer should only initialize those things that always need to be initialized for all members of that class.

In the constructor for Foo_Derived, you can use an initializer list to specify which Bar_Derived constructor to invoke. The Bar_Derived constructor can use any Bar constructor it wishes. If you don't have a Bar_Derived constructor that constructs Foo_Derived::bar the way you want it, you should write one or rethink how you have your hierarchy set up.

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Thanks. I was hoping I could avoid this. The simplest fix is to add the new stuff to the Bar_base but those wouldn't belong and is wrong since Foo knows nothing about the new stuff; only Foo_derived does. Another way I can think of fixing it, is have Foo and Bar be a member of Foo_derived and Bar_derived (which are no longer derived from Foo or Bar), this way I could make "wrappers" that directly call the appropriate functions in the base class when needed while adding some new stuff. –  GradGuy Feb 14 '12 at 4:16
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