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I have a nested-View setup which can get somewhat deep in my application. There are a bunch of ways I could think of initializing, rendering and appending the sub-views, but I'm wondering what common practice is.

Here are a couple I've thought of:

initialize : function () {

    this.subView1 = new Subview({options});
    this.subView2 = new Subview({options});
},

render : function () {

    this.$el.html(this.template());

    this.subView1.setElement('.some-el').render();
    this.subView2.setElement('.some-el').render();
}

Pros: You don't have to worry about maintaining the right DOM order with appending. The views are initialized early on, so there isn't as much to do all at once in the render function.

Cons: You are forced to re-delegateEvents(), which might be costly? The parent view's render function is cluttered with all of the subview rendering that needs to happen? You don't have the ability to set the tagName of the elements, so the template needs to maintain the correct tagNames.

Another way:

initialize : function () {

},

render : function () {

    this.$el.empty();

    this.subView1 = new Subview({options});
    this.subView2 = new Subview({options});

    this.$el.append(this.subView1.render().el, this.subView2.render().el);
}

Pros: You don't have to re-delegate events. You don't need a template that just contains empty placeholders and your tagName's are back to being defined by the view.

Cons: You now have to make sure to append things in the right order. The parent view's render is still cluttered by the subview rendering.

With an onRender event:

initialize : function () {
    this.on('render', this.onRender);
    this.subView1 = new Subview({options});
    this.subView2 = new Subview({options});
},

render : function () {

    this.$el.html(this.template);

    //other stuff

    return this.trigger('render');
},

onRender : function () {

    this.subView1.setElement('.some-el').render();
    this.subView2.setElement('.some-el').render();
}

Pros: The subview logic is now separated from the view's render() method.

With an onRender event:

initialize : function () {
    this.on('render', this.onRender);
},

render : function () {

    this.$el.html(this.template);

    //other stuff

    return this.trigger('render');
},

onRender : function () {
    this.subView1 = new Subview();
    this.subView2 = new Subview();
    this.subView1.setElement('.some-el').render();
    this.subView2.setElement('.some-el').render();
}

I've kind of mix and matched a bunch of different practices across all of these examples (so sorry about that) but what are the ones that you would keep or add? and what would you not do?

Summary of practices:

  • Instantiate subviews in initialize or in render?
  • Perform all sub-view rendering logic in render or in onRender?
  • Use setElement or append/appendTo?
share|improve this question
    
I would be careful about the new without delete, you got memory leak in there. –  vimdude Feb 14 '12 at 4:14
    
Don't worry, I have a close method and an onClose that cleans up children, but I'm just curious about how to instantiate and render them in the first place. –  Ian Storm Taylor Feb 14 '12 at 7:33
3  
@abdelsaid: In JavaScript, the GC handles deallocation of memory. delete in JS is not the same as the delete from C++. It's a very poorly named keyword if you ask me. –  Mike Bantegui Jul 31 '12 at 21:18
    
@MikeBantegui got it but it's the same as in java except that in JS to free memory you just need to assign null. To clarify what I mean, try this create a loop with a new object inside and monitor the memory. Of course GC will get to it but you will loose memory before it gets to it. In this case Render which might get called many times. –  vimdude Aug 1 '12 at 14:21
2  
I'm a novice Backbone developer. Can anybody please explain why does example 1 forces us to re-delegate events? (Or should I ask this in it's own question?) Thanks. –  pilau Jul 1 '13 at 9:16

6 Answers 6

I have generally seen/used a couple of different solutions:

Solution 1

var OuterView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.inner = new InnerView();
    },

    render: function() {
        this.$el.html(template); // or this.$el.empty() if you have no template
        this.$el.append(this.inner.$el);
        this.inner.render();
    }
});

var InnerView = Backbone.View.extend({
    render: function() {
        this.$el.html(template);
        this.delegateEvents();
    }
});

This is similar to your first example, with a few changes:

  1. The order in which you append the sub elements matters
  2. The outer view does not contain the html elements to be set on the inner view(s) (meaning you can still specify tagName in the inner view)
  3. render() is called AFTER the inner view's element has been placed into the DOM, which is helpful if your inner view's render() method is placing/sizing itself on the page based on other elements' position/size (which is a common use case, in my experience)

Solution 2

var OuterView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.render();
    },

    render: function() {
        this.$el.html(template); // or this.$el.empty() if you have no template
        this.inner = new InnerView();
        this.$el.append(this.inner.$el);
    }
});

var InnerView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function() {
        this.render();
    },

    render: function() {
        this.$el.html(template);
    }
});

Solution 2 may look cleaner, but it has caused some strange things in my experience and has affected performance negatively.

I generally use Solution 1, for a couple of reasons:

  1. A lot of my views rely on already being in the DOM in their render() method
  2. When the outer view is re-rendered, views don't have to be re-initialized, which re-initialization can cause memory leaks and also cause freaky issues with existing bindings

Keep in mind that if you are initializing a new View() every time render() is called, that initialization is going to call delegateEvents() anyway. So that shouldn't necessarily be a "con", as you've expressed.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for solution 1 –  Teodor Talov Jul 21 '13 at 4:16
    
Neither of these solutions work up the sub view tree calling View.remove, which may be vital in doing custom cleanup in the view, which would otherwise prevent garbage collection –  Dominic Tobias Jun 11 at 14:33

This is a perennial problem with Backbone and, in my experience, there's not really a satisfying answer to this question. I share your frustration, especially since there is so little guidance despite how common this use case is. That said, I usually go with something akin to your second example.

First of all, I would dismiss out of hand anything that requires you to re-delegate events. Backbone's event-driven view model is one of its most crucial components, and to lose that functionality simply because your application is non-trivial would leave a bad taste in any programmer's mouth. So scratch number one.

Regarding your third example, I think it's just an end-run around the conventional rendering practice and doesn't add much meaning. Perhaps if you're doing actual event triggering (i.e., not a contrived "onRender" event), it would be worth just binding those events to render itself. If you find render becoming unwieldy and complex, you have too few subviews.

Back to your second example, which is probably the lesser of the three evils. Here is example code lifted from Recipes With Backbone, found on page 42 of my PDF edition:

...
render: function() {
    $(this.el).html(this.template());
    this.addAll();
    return this;
},
  addAll: function() {
    this.collection.each(this.addOne);
},
  addOne: function(model) {
    view = new Views.Appointment({model: model});
    view.render();
    $(this.el).append(view.el);
    model.bind('remove', view.remove);
}

This is only a slightly more sophisticated setup than your second example: they specifiy a set of functions, addAll and addOne, that do the dirty work. I think this approach is workable (and I certainly use it); but it still leaves a bizarre aftertaste. (Pardon all these tongue metaphors.)

To your point on appending in the right order: if you're strictly appending, sure, that's a limitation. But make sure you consider all possible templating schemes. Perhaps you'd actually like a placeholder element (e.g., an empty div or ul) that you can then replaceWith a new (DOM) element that holds the appropriate subviews. Appending isn't the only solution, and you can certainly get around the ordering problem if you care about it that much, but I would imagine you have a design issue if it is tripping you up. Remember, subviews can have subviews, and they should if it's appropriate. That way, you have a rather tree-like structure, which is quite nice: each subview adds all its subviews, in order, before the parent view adds another, and so on.

Unfortunately, solution #2 is probably the best you can hope for using out-of-the-box Backbone. If you're interested in checking out third-party libraries, one that I have looked into (but haven't actually had any time to play with yet) is Backbone.LayoutManager, which seems to have a healthier method of adding subviews. However, even they have had recent debates on similar issues to these.

share|improve this answer
3  
The penultimate line -- model.bind('remove', view.remove); -- shouldn't you just do that in the Appointment's initialize function to keep them separate? –  ash May 8 '12 at 6:34
2  
What about when a view cannot be re-instantiated every time it's parent renders because it keeps a state? –  mor Oct 11 '13 at 15:25
    
Stop all this craziness and just use the Backbone.subviews plugin! –  Brave Dave Jan 10 '14 at 19:10

I have, what I believe to be, a quite comprehensive solution to this problem. It allows a model within a collection to change, and have only its view re-rendered (rather than the entire collection). It also handles removal of zombie views through the close() methods.

var SubView = Backbone.View.extend({
    // tagName: must be implemented
    // className: must be implemented
    // template: must be implemented

    initialize: function() {
        this.model.on("change", this.render, this);
        this.model.on("close", this.close, this);
    },

    render: function(options) {
        console.log("rendering subview for",this.model.get("name"));
        var defaultOptions = {};
        options = typeof options === "object" ? $.extend(true, defaultOptions, options) : defaultOptions;
        this.$el.html(this.template({model: this.model.toJSON(), options: options})).fadeIn("fast");
        return this;
    },

    close: function() {
        console.log("closing subview for",this.model.get("name"));
        this.model.off("change", this.render, this);
        this.model.off("close", this.close, this);
        this.remove();
    }
});
var ViewCollection = Backbone.View.extend({
    // el: must be implemented
    // subViewClass: must be implemented

    initialize: function() {
        var self = this;
        self.collection.on("add", self.addSubView, self);
        self.collection.on("remove", self.removeSubView, self);
        self.collection.on("reset", self.reset, self);
        self.collection.on("closeAll", self.closeAll, self);
        self.collection.reset = function(models, options) {
            self.closeAll();
            Backbone.Collection.prototype.reset.call(this, models, options);
        };
        self.reset();
    },

    reset: function() {
        this.$el.empty();
        this.render();
    },

    render: function() {
        console.log("rendering viewcollection for",this.collection.models);
        var self = this;
        self.collection.each(function(model) {
            self.addSubView(model);
        });
        return self;
    },

    addSubView: function(model) {
        var sv = new this.subViewClass({model: model});
        this.$el.append(sv.render().el);
    },

    removeSubView: function(model) {
        model.trigger("close");
    },

    closeAll: function() {
        this.collection.each(function(model) {
            model.trigger("close");
        });
    }
});

Usage:

var PartView = SubView.extend({
    tagName: "tr",
    className: "part",
    template: _.template($("#part-row-template").html())
});

var PartListView = ViewCollection.extend({
    el: $("table#parts"),
    subViewClass: PartView
});
share|improve this answer

Surprised this hasn't been mentioned yet, but I'd seriously consider using Marionette.

It enforces a bit more structure to Backbone apps, including specific view types (ListView, ItemView, Region and Layout), adding proper Controllers and a lot more.

Here is the project on Github and a great guide by Addy Osmani in the book Backbone Fundamentals to get you started.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not answer the question. –  Ceasar Bautista Feb 2 at 20:16
1  
@CeasarBautista I don't go into how to use Marionette to accomplish this but Marionette does indeed solve the above problem –  Dana Woodman Feb 3 at 0:28

Check out this mixin for creating and rendering subviews:

https://github.com/rotundasoftware/backbone.subviews

It is a minimalist solution that addresses a lot of the issues discussed in this thread, including rendering order, not having to re-delegate events, etc. Note that the case of a collection view (where each model in the collection is represented with one subview) is a different topic. Best general solution I am aware of to that case is the CollectionView in Marionette.

share|improve this answer

I don't really like any of the above solutions. I prefer for this configuration over each view having to manually do work in the render method.

  • views can be a function or object returning an object of view definitions
  • When a parent's .remove is called, the .remove of nested children from the lowest order up should be called (all the way from sub-sub-sub views)
  • By default the parent view passes it's own model and collection, but options can be added and overridden.

Here's an example:

views: {
    '.js-toolbar-left': CancelBtnView, // shorthand
    '.js-toolbar-right': {
        view: DoneBtnView,
        append: true
    },
    '.js-notification': {
        view: Notification.View,
        options: function() { // Options passed when instantiating
            return {
                message: this.state.get('notificationMessage'),
                state: 'information'
            };
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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