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I want to read, update, insert data from/to a flat file in a structure like below (simple version) in php and also manually. What would be easiest way to deal with it?

$schools = array(

    "PHCS"=> array(
        "full_name"=> "Pacific Hills Christian School",
        "version"=> "4.0.2b",
        "etc"=> "etc"
      ),

    "WAC"=> array(
        "full_name"=> "Wollondilly Anglican College",
        "version"=> "4.0.1",
        "etc"=> "etc"
      ),
  );

One has to be very precise with syntax and indents when using YAML and editing XML in vi could be bit messy too.

So I was thinking of using a php array variable? How can I save it in a format like above?

share|improve this question
    
be more specific please. you mean to a database? seems pretty straightforward if thats the case. – Rooster Feb 14 '12 at 4:30
    
I have a simple flat file in my mind. – Radek Feb 14 '12 at 4:37
2  
    
@Phil: do you want to create an answer from that? I'll most likely accept it. – Radek Feb 14 '12 at 4:42
    
@Phil: good response, please create an answer and ping here. – halfer Feb 14 '12 at 10:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Couple of things come to mind:

  • Serialisation, e.g. file_put_contents($file, serialize($schools))
  • sqlite, which isn't a flat file, but is very easy to get started with - you just need to point PDO at your database file, and off you go. You can edit via CLI and web-based tools.

Edit: ah, if you need to edit via a text editor, those won't be very good. You could instead use the format you have in PHP -

return array(

    "PHCS"=> array(
        "full_name"=> "Pacific Hills Christian School",
        "version"=> "4.0.2b",
        "etc"=> "etc"
      ),

        "WAC"=> array(
        "full_name" => "Wollondilly Anglican College",
        "version"=> "4.0.1",
        "etc"=> "etc"
    ),
  );

Then you can pop that in a file and do $schools = require($schools) and it will import nicely. I use this for data fixtures, and it works quite well.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, thanks to Phil who suggested var_export() - that would write the file for my last suggestion. I didn't know about that call! – halfer Feb 14 '12 at 10:42

Well, if you have to edit the file by hand, it's pretty hard to beat YAML because that format is probably about as close as you're going to come (on this planet, at least...) to "a file format that was designed to be friendly to being edited by hand."

You ponderings of "using a PHP array-variable" are really irrelevant here, because such notions only apply to the operation of a program ... after it has read the data in and before it subsequently writes the data back out. They don't have anything at all to do with what format you decided to use.

I'd suggest that you figure out what data representation is easiest for humans to deal with, then write the computer program around that. Furthermore, since the possibility exists that the humans snafu'd something, the program should be distrustful of its inputs. It should respond "graciously, meaningfully, and diplomatically" if it encounters garbage, for instance:

  • "Oops, I simply couldn't read that file, at all."
  • "Wait a minute: this entry is supposed to begin with a three or four-character upper case name, such as WAC or PACS, but at line 123456 it doesn't."
  • "Wait a minute: this entry is supposed to contain at least the following keys: "full_name," "version," and "etc." But line 567891 doesn't do that."
  • "Because I just found the following 5 errors in this input file, as previously listed, I hereby decline to process any part of it. (Therefore, I didn't just hose your database.)"
share|improve this answer

well, you may try jason_encode / jason_decode

it helps you format all your data for output. It also helps u managing data.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.json-encode.php

share|improve this answer
    
I completely forgot json ... – Radek Feb 14 '12 at 5:00
    
JSON can be a bit tricky to write to manually though - matching up braces can be a pain, especially since it doesn't often contain a lot of newlines :) – halfer Feb 14 '12 at 10:40
    
It looks like / is escaped in JSON. I have PHP 5.3 so I cannot use JSON_UNESCAPED_SLASHES option for json_encode. – Radek Feb 14 '12 at 22:10

I used @Phil's solution php.net/manual/en/function.var-export.php

Don't forget to insert

  • a PHP scripting block that starts with <?php and ends with ?>
  • variable name following =

you can use something like

<?php \n\n\n\$schools=\n" . var_export($schools,true) . "\n\n\n?>";

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