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In python, is there a difference between say:

if text == 'sometext':
    print(text)
if text == 'nottext':
    print("notanytext")

and

 if text == 'sometext':
        print(text)
 elif text == 'nottext':
        print("notanytext")

Just wondering if multiple ifs could cause any unwanted problems and if it was better practice to use elifs

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5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Multiple if's means your code would go and check all the if conditions, where as in case of elif, if one if condition satisfies it would not check other conditions..

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An other easy way to see the difference between the use of if and elif is this example here:

def analyzeAge( age ):
   if age < 21:
       print "You are a child"
   if age > 21:
       print "You are an adult"
   else:   #Handle all cases were 'age' is negative 
       print "The age must be a positive integer!"

analyzeAge( 18 )  #Calling the function
>You are a child
>The age must be a positive integer!

Here you can see that when 18 is used as input the answer is (surprisingly) 2 sentences. That is wrong. It should only be the first sentence.

That is because BOTH if statements are being evaluated. The computer sees them as two separate statements:

  • The first one is true for 18 and so "You are a child" is printed.
  • The second if statement is false and therefore the else part is executed printing "The age must be a positive integer".

The elif fixes this and makes the two if statements 'stick together' as one:

def analyzeAge( age ):
   if age < 21:
       print "You are a child"
   elif age > 21:
       print "You are an adult"
   else:   #Handle all cases were 'age' is negative 
       print "The age must be a positive integer!"

analyzeAge( 18 )  #Calling the function
>You are a child
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def multipleif(text):
    if text == 'sometext':
        print(text)
    if text == 'nottext':
        print("notanytext")

def eliftest(text):
    if text == 'sometext':
        print(text)
    elif text == 'nottext':
        print("notanytext")

text = "sometext"

timeit multipleif(text)
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.22 us per loop

timeit elif(text)
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.13 us per loop

You can see that elif is slightly faster. This would probably more apparent if there were more ifs and more elifs.

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In your above example there are differences, because your second code has indented the elif, it would be actually inside the if block, and is a syntactically and logically incorrect in this example.

Python uses line indentions to define code blocks (most C like languages use {} to enclose a block of code, but python uses line indentions), so when you are coding, you should consider the indentions seriously.

your sample 1:

if text == 'sometext':
    print(text)
elif text == 'nottext':
    print("notanytext")

both if and elif are indented the same, so they are related to the same logic. your second example:

if text == 'sometext':
    print(text)
    elif text == 'nottext':
        print("notanytext")

elif is indented more than if, before another block encloses it, so it is considered inside the if block. and since inside the if there is no other nested if, the elif is being considered as a syntax error by Python interpreter.

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sorry, i fixed them –  Billjk Feb 14 '12 at 4:35

Here's another way of thinking about this:

Let's say you have two specific conditions that an if/else catchall structure will not suffice:

Example:

I have a 3 X 3 tic-tac-toe board and I want to print the coordinates of both diagonals and not the rest of the squares.

Tic-Tac-Toe Coordinate System

I decide to use and if/elif structure instead...

for row in range(3):
    for col in range(3):
        if row == col:
            print('diagonal1', '(%s, %s)' % (i, j))
        elif col == 2 - row:
            print('\t' * 6 + 'diagonal2', '(%s, %s)' % (i, j))

The output is:

diagonal1 (0, 0)
                        diagonal2 (0, 2)
diagonal1 (1, 1)
                        diagonal2 (2, 0)
diagonal1 (2, 2)

But wait! I wanted to include all three coordinates of diagonal2 since (1, 1) is part of diagonal 2 as well.

The 'elif' caused a dependency with the 'if' so that if the original 'if' was satisfied the 'elif' will not initiate even if the 'elif' logic satisfied the condition as well.

Let's change the second 'elif' to an 'if' instead.

for row in range(3):
    for col in range(3):
        if row == col:
            print('diagonal1', '(%s, %s)' % (i, j))
        if col == 2 - row:
            print('\t' * 6 + 'diagonal2', '(%s, %s)' % (i, j))

I now get the output that I wanted because the two 'if' statements are mutually exclusive.

diagonal1 (0, 0)
                        diagonal2 (0, 2)
diagonal1 (1, 1)
                        diagonal2 (1, 1)
                        diagonal2 (2, 0)
diagonal1 (2, 2)

Ultimately knowing what kind or result you want to achieve will determine what type of conditional relationship/structure you code.

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