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    public boolean clearSelection()
  {
    int i = 0;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
      i = 1;
      Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
      while (localIterator.hasNext())
        ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
      this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }
    return i;
  }

How to convert the integer to boolean?

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3  
Java is not like C++.In C++ 0 is false and other integers are true, in Java integer can't be used as boolean. –  shift66 Feb 14 '12 at 4:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Try using this return

return i == 1;

or just use a boolean to start with and a better name

 public boolean clearSelection()
  {
    boolean flag = false;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
      flag = true;
      Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
      while (localIterator.hasNext())
        ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
      this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }
    return flag;
  }

It continues to mystify me why people use i -- a horrible variable name. Looks like 1 and does not convey any meaning.

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3  
Concerning i: "There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things" -- Phil Karlton –  Jan Dvorak Dec 10 '12 at 17:38
    
@JanDvorak - Thank you for that quote. As a corollary : The first step in naming things well is not using i. –  Hogan Dec 10 '12 at 18:03
    
@Hogan Not sure which font you're using, it sure don't look like a 1 in my IDE –  b1nary.atr0phy Jun 5 '13 at 5:59
1  
i comes from Fortran. –  claymation Aug 21 '13 at 1:01
2  
IMO i comes from "iterate", "iterator" –  Petko Petkov Nov 9 '13 at 17:10

Declare i as a boolean:

public boolean clearSelection()
{
    boolean i = false;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
        i = true;
        Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
        while (localIterator.hasNext())
          ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
        this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
    }
    return i;
}
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public boolean clearSelection(){
    int i = 0;
    if (!this.m_SelectedComps.isEmpty())
    {
        i = 1;
        Iterator localIterator = this.m_SelectedComps.iterator();
        while (localIterator.hasNext())
            ((AnnotComponent)localIterator.next()).remove();
        this.m_SelectedComps.clear();
     }
     return (i!=0);
}
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May be you can just modify your return statement without much change to code as below:

return i > 0 ? true : false ;
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Nice but what if the int equal to 0! It won't work even if you use >= because when int is null this line of code will return true always. –  Mazen Kasser Jul 25 '13 at 23:20

I know this thread is old but wanted add some code that helped me and might help others searching this...

You could use org.apache.commons.lang api to convert an int to boolean using the BooleanUtils class:

BooleanUtils.toBoolean(int value)

"Converts an int to a boolean using the convention that zero is false." (Javadocs)

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